↓ Skip to main content

Individual-level personality influences social foraging and collective behaviour in wild birds

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, August 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
35 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
107 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
345 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Individual-level personality influences social foraging and collective behaviour in wild birds
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, August 2014
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2014.1016
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lucy M. Aplin, Damien R. Farine, Richard P. Mann, Ben C. Sheldon

Abstract

There is increasing evidence that animal groups can maintain coordinated behaviour and make collective decisions based on simple interaction rules. Effective collective action may be further facilitated by individual variation within groups, particularly through leader-follower polymorphisms. Recent studies have suggested that individual-level personality traits influence the degree to which individuals use social information, are attracted to conspecifics, or act as leaders/followers. However, evidence is equivocal and largely limited to laboratory studies. We use an automated data-collection system to conduct an experiment testing the relationship between personality and collective decision-making in the wild. First, we report that foraging flocks of great tits (Parus major) show strikingly synchronous behaviour. A predictive model of collective decision-making replicates patterns well, suggesting simple interaction rules are sufficient to explain the observed social behaviour. Second, within groups, individuals with more reactive personalities behave more collectively, moving to within-flock areas of higher density. By contrast, proactive individuals tend to move to and feed at spatial periphery of flocks. Finally, comparing alternative simulations of flocking with empirical data, we demonstrate that variation in personality promotes within-patch movement while maintaining group cohesion. Our results illustrate the importance of incorporating individual variability in models of social behaviour.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 35 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 345 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 6 2%
United States 4 1%
South Africa 2 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Poland 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Other 4 1%
Unknown 323 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 103 30%
Researcher 57 17%
Student > Master 54 16%
Student > Bachelor 51 15%
Unspecified 24 7%
Other 56 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 232 67%
Unspecified 45 13%
Environmental Science 32 9%
Psychology 13 4%
Engineering 3 <1%
Other 20 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 October 2017.
All research outputs
#723,826
of 12,984,175 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#2,138
of 7,292 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,464
of 187,999 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#57
of 151 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,984,175 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,292 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 28.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 187,999 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 151 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.