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Opposing Influences of Affective State Valence on Visual Cortical Encoding

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neuroscience, June 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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141 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
282 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Opposing Influences of Affective State Valence on Visual Cortical Encoding
Published in
Journal of Neuroscience, June 2009
DOI 10.1523/jneurosci.5387-08.2009
Pubmed ID
Authors

T. W. Schmitz, E. De Rosa, A. K. Anderson

Abstract

Positive and negative emotional states are thought to have originated from fundamentally opposing approach and avoidance behaviors. Furthermore, affective valence has been hypothesized to exert opposing biases in cognitive control. Here we examined with functional magnetic resonance imaging whether the opposing influences of positive and negative states extend to perceptual encoding in the visual cortices. Based on prior behavioral research, we hypothesized that positive states would broaden and negative states would narrow visual field of view (FOV). Positive, neutral, and negative states were induced on alternating blocks. To index FOV, observers then viewed brief presentations (300 ms) of face/place concentric center/surround stimuli on interleaved blocks. Central faces were attended, rendering the place surrounds unattended. As face and place information was presented at different visual eccentricities, our physiological metric of FOV was a valence-dependent modulation of place processing in the parahippocampal place area (PPA). Consistent with our hypotheses, positive affective states increased and negative states decreased PPA response to novel places as well as adaptation to repeated places. Individual differences in self-reported positive and negative affect correlated inversely with PPA encoding of peripheral places, as well as with activation in the mesocortical prefrontal cortex and amygdala. Psychophysiological interaction analyses further demonstrated that valence-dependent responses in the PPA arose from opponent coupling with extrafoveal regions of the primary visual cortex during positive and negative states. These findings collectively suggest that affective valence differentially biases gating of early visual inputs, fundamentally altering the scope of perceptual encoding.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 282 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 7 2%
Canada 5 2%
United Kingdom 4 1%
Germany 2 <1%
Switzerland 2 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Other 2 <1%
Unknown 256 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 57 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 54 19%
Student > Master 37 13%
Student > Bachelor 28 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 20 7%
Other 61 22%
Unknown 25 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 149 53%
Neuroscience 24 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 8%
Social Sciences 9 3%
Computer Science 9 3%
Other 30 11%
Unknown 38 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 June 2022.
All research outputs
#1,730,169
of 21,436,792 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neuroscience
#3,185
of 22,660 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,267
of 111,207 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neuroscience
#29
of 291 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,436,792 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 22,660 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 111,207 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 291 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.