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Holistic assessment of occurrence and fate of metolachlor within environmental compartments of agricultural watersheds

Overview of attention for article published in Science of the Total Environment, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
26 Mendeley
Title
Holistic assessment of occurrence and fate of metolachlor within environmental compartments of agricultural watersheds
Published in
Science of the Total Environment, January 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.08.154
Pubmed ID
Authors

Claire E. Rose, Richard H. Coupe, Paul D. Capel, Richard M.T. Webb

Abstract

Metolachlor [(RS)-2-Chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methyl-phenyl)-N-(1-methoxypropan-2-yl)acetamide] and two degradates (metolachlor ethane-sulfonic acid and metolachlor oxanilic acid) are commonly observed in surface and groundwater. The behavior and fate of these compounds were examined over a 12-year period in seven agricultural watersheds in the United States. They were quantified in air, rain, streams, overland flow, groundwater, soil water, subsurface drain water, and water at the stream/groundwater interface. The compounds were frequently detected in surface and groundwater associated with agricultural areas. A mass budget approach, based on all available data from the study and literature, was used to determine a percentage-wise generalized distribution and fate of applied parent metolachlor in typical agricultural environments. In these watersheds, about 90% of applied metolachlor was taken up by plants or degraded, 10% volatilized, and 0.3% returned as rainfall. One percent was transported to surface water, while an equal amount infiltrated into the unsaturated zone soil water. <0.02% reached the groundwater. Subsurface flow paths resulted in greater degradation of metolachlor because degradation reactions had more time to proceed. An understanding of the residence times of water in the different environmental compartments, and the important processes affecting metolachlor as it is transported along flowpaths among the environmental compartments allows for a degree of predictability of metolachlor's fate. Degradates with long half-lives can be used (in a limited capacity) as tracers of metolachlor, because of their persistence and widespread occurrence in the environment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 6 23%
Student > Master 5 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 12%
Researcher 3 12%
Other 6 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 9 35%
Environmental Science 4 15%
Engineering 3 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 12%
Arts and Humanities 2 8%
Other 5 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 September 2017.
All research outputs
#6,286,264
of 12,269,384 outputs
Outputs from Science of the Total Environment
#4,269
of 8,421 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,496
of 267,883 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science of the Total Environment
#39
of 131 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,269,384 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,421 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,883 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 131 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.