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Characterization of Monkeypox virus infection in African rope squirrels (Funisciurus sp.)

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, August 2017
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2 tweeters

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Title
Characterization of Monkeypox virus infection in African rope squirrels (Funisciurus sp.)
Published in
PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, August 2017
DOI 10.1371/journal.pntd.0005809
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elizabeth A. Falendysz, Juan G. Lopera, Jeffrey B. Doty, Yoshinori Nakazawa, Colleen Crill, Faye Lorenzsonn, Lem’s N. Kalemba, Monica D. Ronderos, Andres Mejia, Jean M. Malekani, Kevin Karem, Darin S. Carroll, Jorge E. Osorio, Tonie E. Rocke

Abstract

Monkeypox (MPX) is a zoonotic disease endemic in Central and West Africa and is caused by Monkeypox virus (MPXV), the most virulent orthopoxvirus affecting humans since the eradication of Variola virus (VARV). Many aspects of the MPXV transmission cycle, including the natural host of the virus, remain unknown. African rope squirrels (Funisciurus spp.) are considered potential reservoirs of MPXV, as serosurveillance data in Central Africa has confirmed the circulation of the virus in these rodent species [1,2]. In order to understand the tissue tropism and clinical signs associated with infection with MPXV in these species, wild-caught rope squirrels were experimentally infected via intranasal and intradermal exposure with a recombinant MPXV strain from Central Africa engineered to express the luciferase gene. After infection, we monitored viral replication and shedding via in vivo bioluminescent imaging, viral culture and real time PCR. MPXV infection in African rope squirrels caused mortality and moderate to severe morbidity, with clinical signs including pox lesions in the skin, eyes, mouth and nose, dyspnea, and profuse nasal discharge. Both intranasal and intradermal exposures induced high levels of viremia, fast systemic spread, and long periods of viral shedding. Shedding and luminescence peaked at day 6 post infection and was still detectable after 15 days. Interestingly, one sentinel animal, housed in the same room but in a separate cage, also developed severe MPX disease and was euthanized. This study indicates that MPXV causes significant pathology in African rope squirrels and infected rope squirrels shed large quantities of virus, supporting their role as a potential source of MPXV transmission to humans and other animals in endemic MPX regions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 19%
Student > Postgraduate 3 12%
Student > Master 3 12%
Other 2 8%
Other 4 15%
Unknown 3 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 35%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 5 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 19%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 4%
Social Sciences 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 4 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 November 2017.
All research outputs
#8,814,696
of 15,026,986 outputs
Outputs from PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
#4,680
of 6,648 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#137,092
of 272,269 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
#182
of 220 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,026,986 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,648 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.8. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,269 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 220 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.