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How to Talk with Patients about Incarceration and Health

Overview of attention for article published in AMA Journal of Ethics, September 2017
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Mentioned by

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27 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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21 Mendeley
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Title
How to Talk with Patients about Incarceration and Health
Published in
AMA Journal of Ethics, September 2017
DOI 10.1001/journalofethics.2017.19.9.ecas2-1709
Pubmed ID
Abstract

The United States has the highest incarceration rate of any nation in the world-more than 700 people per 100,000. For this reason alone, clinicians practicing in the US should be aware of the numerous ways in which incarceration adversely affects the health of individuals, their families, and communities. While we clinicians are taught how to discuss ways that culture, religion, or sexuality can affect health outcomes, we are not instructed on how to talk about incarceration history with patients when it might be affecting their health, as highlighted in the case scenario. Here I present a "structural vulnerability" screen, a theoretical approach that clinics or individuals can take to better understand how structures of power (i.e., mass incarceration) directly and indirectly affect our patients. I also offer practical tips on how to talk to patients about incarceration history and why it matters for good health.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 27 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 24%
Student > Master 5 24%
Librarian 2 10%
Researcher 2 10%
Other 1 5%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 4 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 6 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 10%
Social Sciences 2 10%
Psychology 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 24%