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Carbohydrates for training and competition

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Sports Sciences, June 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#1 of 3,006)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
51 news outlets
twitter
246 tweeters
facebook
29 Facebook pages
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
315 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
1380 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Carbohydrates for training and competition
Published in
Journal of Sports Sciences, June 2011
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2011.585473
Pubmed ID
Authors

Louise M. Burke, John A. Hawley, Stephen H. S. Wong, Asker E. Jeukendrup

Abstract

An athlete's carbohydrate intake can be judged by whether total daily intake and the timing of consumption in relation to exercise maintain adequate carbohydrate substrate for the muscle and central nervous system ("high carbohydrate availability") or whether carbohydrate fuel sources are limiting for the daily exercise programme ("low carbohydrate availability"). Carbohydrate availability is increased by consuming carbohydrate in the hours or days prior to the session, intake during exercise, and refuelling during recovery between sessions. This is important for the competition setting or for high-intensity training where optimal performance is desired. Carbohydrate intake during exercise should be scaled according to the characteristics of the event. During sustained high-intensity sports lasting ~1 h, small amounts of carbohydrate, including even mouth-rinsing, enhance performance via central nervous system effects. While 30-60 g · h(-1) is an appropriate target for sports of longer duration, events >2.5 h may benefit from higher intakes of up to 90 g · h(-1). Products containing special blends of different carbohydrates may maximize absorption of carbohydrate at such high rates. In real life, athletes undertake training sessions with varying carbohydrate availability. Whether implementing additional "train-low" strategies to increase the training adaptation leads to enhanced performance in well-trained individuals is unclear.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 246 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,380 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 12 <1%
Spain 6 <1%
Brazil 4 <1%
Australia 3 <1%
Norway 3 <1%
United States 3 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 1345 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 429 31%
Student > Master 327 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 102 7%
Student > Postgraduate 94 7%
Other 81 6%
Other 211 15%
Unknown 136 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 508 37%
Medicine and Dentistry 212 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 193 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 123 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 62 4%
Other 119 9%
Unknown 163 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 589. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 February 2020.
All research outputs
#13,265
of 14,291,926 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Sports Sciences
#1
of 3,006 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#52
of 93,313 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Sports Sciences
#1
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,291,926 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,006 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 93,313 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.