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Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma in Malawi: a report of three cases

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, September 2017
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Title
Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma in Malawi: a report of three cases
Published in
BMC Cancer, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12885-017-3612-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tamiwe Tomoka, Eric Powers, Toon van der Gronde, Amy Amuquandoh, Bal Mukunda Dhungel, Coxcilly Kampani, Steve Kamiza, Nathan D. Montgomery, Yuri Fedoriw, Satish Gopal

Abstract

Extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma (ENKTCL) reports from sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) are remarkably rare, despite early childhood acquisition and high prevalence of the causative infectious agent, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and frequent occurrence of other lymphoproliferative disorders causally associated with EBV. At a national teaching hospital in Malawi, three patients of African descent were seen with ENKTCL between 2013 and 2014. Patients were aged between 29 and 60 years, two with craniofacial involvement and one with a primary abdominal tumor, and all were HIV-negative. All had systemic B symptoms, and two severely impaired performance status. On histologic review, morphology and immunophenotyping demonstrated classical ENKTCL features in all cases, including diffuse proliferations of intermediate-to-large atypical lymphocytes with high mitotic activity and extensive background necrosis, positivity for CD3 and CD56, and negativity for CD20. By in situ hybridization, all three tumors were positive for EBV-encoded RNA (EBER). Baseline plasma EBV DNA was also markedly elevated for all three patients. Due to radiotherapy and chemotherapy limitations, patients were treated with CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone) with rapid disease progression. All three patients died from progressive lymphoma within 3 months of initial diagnosis. Our experience with these three patients in Malawi can highlight that ENKTCL does indeed occur in SSA, increase familiarity with ENKTCL among clinicians and pathologists throughout the region, and emphasize the need for better diagnosis and treatment for this neglected population.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 21%
Student > Bachelor 3 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 11%
Student > Master 2 11%
Librarian 1 5%
Other 3 16%
Unknown 4 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 26%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 11%
Social Sciences 2 11%
Psychology 1 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 5%
Other 4 21%
Unknown 4 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 September 2017.
All research outputs
#10,786,890
of 12,164,780 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#3,610
of 4,452 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#224,046
of 265,140 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#56
of 61 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 61 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.