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Risk perceptions, attitudes, and knowledge of chikungunya among the public and health professionals: a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in Tropical Medicine & Health, September 2017
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Title
Risk perceptions, attitudes, and knowledge of chikungunya among the public and health professionals: a systematic review
Published in
Tropical Medicine & Health, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s41182-017-0061-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tricia Corrin, Lisa Waddell, Judy Greig, Ian Young, Catherine Hierlihy, Mariola Mascarenhas, Tricia Corrin, Lisa Waddell, Judy Greig, Ian Young, Catherine Hierlihy, Mariola Mascarenhas

Abstract

Recently, attention to chikungunya has increased due to its spread into previously non-endemic areas. Since there is no available treatment or vaccine, most intervention strategies focus on mosquito bite prevention and mosquito control, which require community involvement to be successful. Thus, our objective was to systematically review the global primary literature on the risk perceptions, attitudes, and knowledge of chikungunya among the public and health professionals to inform future research and improve our understanding on which intervention strategies are likely to be successful. Potentially relevant articles were identified through a standardized systematic review (SR) process consisting of the following steps: comprehensive search strategy in seven databases (Scopus, PubMed, CINAHL, CAB, LILACS, Agricola, and Cochrane) and a grey literature search of public health organizations, relevance screening, risk of bias assessment, and data extraction. Two independent reviewers performed each step. Reporting of this SR follows PRISMA reporting guidelines. Thirty-seven relevant articles were identified. The majority of the articles were published since 2011 (83.8%) and reported on studies conducted in Asia (48.7%) and the Indian Ocean Islands (24.3%). The results were separated into four categories: general knowledge and perceptions on chikungunya; perceptions on the risk and severity of chikungunya; knowledge of chikungunya-harboring vectors and transmission; and knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes on mitigation practices. Overall, the systematic review found that risk perceptions, attitudes, and knowledge of chikungunya among the public and health professionals vary across populations and countries and knowledge is higher in areas that have experienced an outbreak. The results suggest that most of the affected populations in this study do not understand mosquito borne diseases or chikungunya and are therefore less likely to protect themselves from mosquito bites. While more research is required to improve the generalizability of this dataset, it appears that a lack of knowledge is an important barrier for motivating community level interventions and personal protection against mosquitoes.

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The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 114 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 114 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 17%
Student > Bachelor 17 15%
Researcher 16 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 5%
Other 18 16%
Unknown 31 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 20%
Social Sciences 12 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 8%
Psychology 8 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 5%
Other 19 17%
Unknown 37 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 September 2017.
All research outputs
#7,304,584
of 11,729,435 outputs
Outputs from Tropical Medicine & Health
#70
of 124 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,461
of 264,173 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Tropical Medicine & Health
#3
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,729,435 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 124 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.8. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,173 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.