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Transmission routes maintaining a viral pathogen of steelhead trout within a complex multi-host assemblage

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology and Evolution, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
20 Mendeley
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Title
Transmission routes maintaining a viral pathogen of steelhead trout within a complex multi-host assemblage
Published in
Ecology and Evolution, September 2017
DOI 10.1002/ece3.3276
Pubmed ID
Authors

Breyta, Rachel, Brito, Ilana, Ferguson, Paige, Kurath, Gael, Naish, Kerry A., Purcell, Maureen K., Wargo, Andrew R., LaDeau, Shannon, Rachel Breyta, Ilana Brito, Paige Ferguson, Gael Kurath, Kerry A. Naish, Maureen K. Purcell, Andrew R. Wargo, Shannon LaDeau

Abstract

This is the first comprehensive region wide, spatially explicit epidemiologic analysis of surveillance data of the aquatic viral pathogen infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) infecting native salmonid fish. The pathogen has been documented in the freshwater ecosystem of the Pacific Northwest of North America since the 1950s, and the current report describes the disease ecology of IHNV during 2000-2012. Prevalence of IHNV infection in monitored salmonid host cohorts ranged from 8% to 30%, with the highest levels observed in juvenile steelhead trout. The spatial distribution of all IHNV-infected cohorts was concentrated in two sub-regions of the study area, where historic burden of the viral disease has been high. During the study period, prevalence levels fluctuated with a temporal peak in 2002. Virologic and genetic surveillance data were analyzed for evidence of three separate but not mutually exclusive transmission routes hypothesized to be maintaining IHNV in the freshwater ecosystem. Transmission between year classes of juvenile fish at individual sites (route 1) was supported at varying levels of certainty in 10%-55% of candidate cases, transmission between neighboring juvenile cohorts (route 2) was supported in 31%-78% of candidate cases, and transmission from adult fish returning to the same site as an infected juvenile cohort was supported in 26%-74% of candidate cases. The results of this study indicate that multiple specific transmission routes are acting to maintain IHNV in juvenile fish, providing concrete evidence that can be used to improve resource management. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that more sophisticated analysis of available spatio-temporal and genetic data is likely to yield greater insight in future studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 25%
Researcher 4 20%
Student > Master 3 15%
Other 2 10%
Professor 2 10%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 2 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 35%
Environmental Science 2 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 10%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 5 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 November 2017.
All research outputs
#681,606
of 12,134,677 outputs
Outputs from Ecology and Evolution
#312
of 3,227 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,172
of 265,112 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology and Evolution
#25
of 216 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,134,677 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,227 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,112 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 216 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.