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Treadmill walking during vocabulary encoding improves verbal long-term memory

Overview of attention for article published in Behavioral and Brain Functions, January 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#8 of 378)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
16 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
103 Mendeley
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Title
Treadmill walking during vocabulary encoding improves verbal long-term memory
Published in
Behavioral and Brain Functions, January 2014
DOI 10.1186/1744-9081-10-24
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maren Schmidt-Kassow, Nadine Zink, Julia Mock, Christian Thiel, Lutz Vogt, Cornelius Abel, Jochen Kaiser

Abstract

Moderate physical activity improves various cognitive functions, particularly when it is applied simultaneously to the cognitive task. In two psychoneuroendocrinological within-subject experiments, we investigated whether very low-intensity motor activity, i.e. walking, during foreign-language vocabulary encoding improves subsequent recall compared to encoding during physical rest. Furthermore, we examined the kinetics of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in serum and salivary cortisol. Previous research has associated both substances with memory performance.In both experiments, subjects performed better when they were motorically active during encoding compared to being sedentary. BDNF in serum was unrelated to memory performance. In contrast we found a positive correlation between salivary cortisol concentration and the number of correctly recalled items. In summary, even very light physical activity during encoding is beneficial for subsequent recall.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 103 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 103 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 22 21%
Student > Bachelor 22 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 11%
Researcher 10 10%
Other 11 11%
Unknown 13 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 32 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 17 17%
Sports and Recreations 16 16%
Social Sciences 6 6%
Neuroscience 5 5%
Other 14 14%
Unknown 13 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 75. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 July 2020.
All research outputs
#298,178
of 15,869,871 outputs
Outputs from Behavioral and Brain Functions
#8
of 378 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,856
of 190,704 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Behavioral and Brain Functions
#1
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,869,871 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 378 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 190,704 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them