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High resolution mapping of modified DNA nucleobases using excision repair enzymes

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Research, July 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
12 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
49 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
62 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
High resolution mapping of modified DNA nucleobases using excision repair enzymes
Published in
Genome Research, July 2014
DOI 10.1101/gr.174052.114
Pubmed ID
Authors

D. Suzi Bryan, Monica Ransom, Biniam Adane, Kerri York, Jay R. Hesselberth

Abstract

The incorporation and creation of modified nucleobases in DNA have profound effects on genome function. We describe methods for mapping positions and local content of modified DNA nucleobases in genomic DNA. We combined in vitro nucleobase excision with massively parallel DNA sequencing (Excision-seq) to determine the locations of modified nucleobases in genomic DNA. We applied the Excision-seq method to map uracil in E. coli and budding yeast and discovered significant variation in uracil content, wherein uracil is excluded from the earliest and latest replicating regions of the genome, possibly driven by changes in nucleotide pool composition. We also used Excision-seq to identify sites of pyrimidine dimer formation induced by UV light exposure, where the method could distinguish between sites of cyclobutane and 6-4 photoproduct formation. These UV mapping data enabled analysis of local sequence bias around pyrimidine dimers and suggested a preference for an adenosine downstream from 6-4 photoproducts. The Excision-seq method is broadly applicable for high precision, genome-wide mapping of modified nucleobases with cognate repair enzymes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Unknown 60 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 20 32%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 29%
Student > Master 4 6%
Student > Bachelor 3 5%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 5%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 7 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 28 45%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 10%
Chemistry 3 5%
Psychology 1 2%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 7 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 August 2014.
All research outputs
#2,771,512
of 15,219,199 outputs
Outputs from Genome Research
#1,652
of 3,672 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,800
of 189,778 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Research
#31
of 46 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,219,199 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 81st percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,672 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 189,778 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 46 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.