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HIGH-OLEIC PEANUTS INCREASE DIET-INDUCED THERMOGENESIS IN OVERWEIGHT AND OBESE MEN.

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrición Hospitalaria, April 2014
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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20 Mendeley
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Title
HIGH-OLEIC PEANUTS INCREASE DIET-INDUCED THERMOGENESIS IN OVERWEIGHT AND OBESE MEN.
Published in
Nutrición Hospitalaria, April 2014
DOI 10.3305/nh.2014.29.5.7235
Pubmed ID
Authors

Duarte Moreira Alves R, Boroni Moreira AP, Silva Macedo V, Brunoro Costa NM, Gonçalves Alfenas RD, Bressan J

Abstract

Background: Evidences suggest that nuts consumption can improve energy metabolism. Purpose: This study aimed to compare the effects of acute ingestion of high-oleic and conventional peanuts on appetite, food intake, and energy metabolism in overweight and obese men. Methods: Seventy one subjects (29.8 ± 2.4 kg/m2) were assigned to the groups: control (CT, n = 24); conventional peanuts (CVP, n = 23); high-oleic peanuts (HOP, n = 24). Subjects consumed 56 g of peanuts (CVP and HOP) or control biscuits (CT) after overnight fasting. Thereafter, energy metabolism was evaluated over 200 minutes, during which diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) and substrate oxidation were analyzed. Appetite sensation was recorded for 3 hours. Statistical analyses were performed using the SAS software considering 5% as the significance level. Results: Postprandial energy expenditure and DIT were significantly higher in HOP than in CVP. Substrate oxidation did not differ between groups. Only HOP presented score below 100 indicating incomplete compensation. CT and CVP showed a complete caloric compensation (scores > 100). Regarding appetite sensation, CVP group felt less "full" than HOP and CT. After 3 hours, satiety score of CVP returned to baseline, whereas HOP and CT remained significantly higher. Hunger scores returned to baseline in CVP and CT and they were maintained significantly lowered in HOP. Conclusion: High-oleic peanuts contributed to higher DIT, higher sensation of fullness and incomplete compensation for energy intake compared to conventional peanuts and may be useful to dietary intervention to reduce body weight.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 1 5%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 5%
Unknown 18 90%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 10%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Unknown 16 80%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 August 2014.
All research outputs
#3,630,335
of 14,466,980 outputs
Outputs from Nutrición Hospitalaria
#58
of 361 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42,182
of 188,970 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrición Hospitalaria
#5
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,466,980 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 361 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 188,970 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.