↓ Skip to main content

Monitoring substance use in prisons: Assessing the potential value of wastewater analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Science & Justice, September 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
44 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Monitoring substance use in prisons: Assessing the potential value of wastewater analysis
Published in
Science & Justice, September 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.scijus.2014.06.006
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emma van Dyken, Phong Thai, Foon Yin Lai, Christoph Ort, Jeremy Prichard, Raimondo Bruno, Wayne Hall, K. Paul Kirkbride, Jochen F. Mueller

Abstract

Prison substance use is a major concern for prison authorities and the wider community. Australia has responded to this problem by implementing the National Corrections Drug Strategy. Across Australia, the true extent of prison substance use cannot be determined. As a result, the effectiveness of the interventions employed as part of this strategy cannot be properly assessed. This has important implications for the allocation of corrective services resources and future policy development. This article explores the benefits and limitations, as well as the ethical and practical issues in using wastewater analysis (WWA) to measure levels of substance use in prisons. It reports results from the first application of WWA to an Australian prison, which supports the use of WWA in this context. Given the increasing concern for prescription misuse in prisons, we also highlight the novel use of WWA to measure the extent of prescription misuse by prisoners. The article concludes that as a result of its objectivity, sensitivity and cost-effectiveness, the use of WWA in prisons warrants further consideration in Australia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
Switzerland 1 2%
Japan 1 2%
Belgium 1 2%
Colombia 1 2%
Unknown 39 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 27%
Student > Master 6 14%
Other 5 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 11%
Unspecified 4 9%
Other 12 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 8 18%
Social Sciences 8 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 16%
Psychology 5 11%
Chemistry 4 9%
Other 12 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 October 2014.
All research outputs
#6,494,430
of 12,018,697 outputs
Outputs from Science & Justice
#186
of 417 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#74,555
of 195,209 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science & Justice
#3
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,018,697 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 417 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 195,209 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.