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Imprinted loci in domestic livestock species as epigenomic targets for artificial selection of complex traits

Overview of attention for article published in Animal Genetics, July 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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34 Mendeley
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Title
Imprinted loci in domestic livestock species as epigenomic targets for artificial selection of complex traits
Published in
Animal Genetics, July 2014
DOI 10.1111/age.12168
Pubmed ID
Authors

D. A. Magee, C. Spillane, E. W. Berkowicz, K. M. Sikora, D. E. MacHugh

Abstract

The phenomenon of genomic imprinting, whereby a subset of mammalian genes display parent-of-origin-specific monoallelic expression, is one of the most active areas of epigenetics research. Over the past two decades, more than 100 imprinted mammalian genes have been identified, while considerable advances have been made in elucidating the molecular mechanisms governing imprinting. These studies have helped to unravel the epigenome - a separate layer of regulatory information contained in eukaryotic chromosomes that influences gene expression and phenotypes without involving changes to the underlying DNA sequence. Although most studies of genomic imprinting in mammals have focussed on mouse models or human biomedical disorders, there is burgeoning interest in the phenotypic effects of imprinted genes in domestic livestock species. In particular, research has focused on imprinted genes influencing foetal growth and development, which are associated with economically important production traits in cattle, sheep and pigs. These findings, when coupled with the data emerging from the various different livestock genome projects, have major implications for the future of animal breeding, health and management. Here, we review current scientific knowledge regarding genomic imprinting in livestock species and evaluate how this information can be used in modern livestock improvement programmes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 9%
Argentina 1 3%
Unknown 30 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 29%
Researcher 9 26%
Student > Master 4 12%
Professor 4 12%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Other 5 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 59%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 18%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 9%
Philosophy 1 3%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 1 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 January 2016.
All research outputs
#3,242,008
of 12,354,561 outputs
Outputs from Animal Genetics
#131
of 861 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,708
of 199,302 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Animal Genetics
#3
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,354,561 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 861 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 199,302 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.