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Impact of a global temperature rise of 1.5 degrees Celsius on Asia’s glaciers

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
13 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
364 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
3 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
62 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
182 Mendeley
Title
Impact of a global temperature rise of 1.5 degrees Celsius on Asia’s glaciers
Published in
Nature, September 2017
DOI 10.1038/nature23878
Pubmed ID
Authors

P. D. A. Kraaijenbrink, M. F. P. Bierkens, A. F. Lutz, W. W. Immerzeel

Abstract

Glaciers in the high mountains of Asia (HMA) make a substantial contribution to the water supply of millions of people, and they are retreating and losing mass as a result of anthropogenic climate change at similar rates to those seen elsewhere. In the Paris Agreement of 2015, 195 nations agreed on the aspiration to limit the level of global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius ( °C) above pre-industrial levels. However, it is not known what an increase of 1.5 °C would mean for the glaciers in HMA. Here we show that a global temperature rise of 1.5 °C will lead to a warming of 2.1 ± 0.1 °C in HMA, and that 64 ± 7 per cent of the present-day ice mass stored in the HMA glaciers will remain by the end of the century. The 1.5 °C goal is extremely ambitious and is projected by only a small number of climate models of the conservative IPCC's Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP)2.6 ensemble. Projections for RCP4.5, RCP6.0 and RCP8.5 reveal that much of the glacier ice is likely to disappear, with projected mass losses of 49 ± 7 per cent, 51 ± 6 per cent and 64 ± 5 per cent, respectively, by the end of the century; these projections have potentially serious consequences for regional water management and mountain communities.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 364 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 182 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 182 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 2%
Other 1 <1%
Lecturer 1 <1%
Professor 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 163 90%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 8 4%
Unspecified 5 3%
Environmental Science 4 2%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 1%
Unknown 163 90%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 357. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 January 2019.
All research outputs
#27,787
of 12,662,048 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#3,160
of 65,570 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,554
of 265,630 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#119
of 812 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,662,048 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 65,570 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 73.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,630 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 812 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.