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Patterns of Smoking and Unhealthy Alcohol Use Following Sexual Trauma Among U.S. Service Members

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Traumatic Stress, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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21 Mendeley
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Title
Patterns of Smoking and Unhealthy Alcohol Use Following Sexual Trauma Among U.S. Service Members
Published in
Journal of Traumatic Stress, September 2017
DOI 10.1002/jts.22214
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amber D. Seelig, Anna C. Rivera, Teresa M. Powell, Emily C. Williams, Arthur V. Peterson, Alyson J. Littman, Charles Maynard, Amy E. Street, Jonathan B. Bricker, Edward J. Boyko

Abstract

In the first known longitudinal study of the topic, we examined whether experiencing sexual assault or sexual harassment while in the military was associated with increased risk for subsequent unhealthy alcohol use and smoking among U.S. service members in the Millennium Cohort Study (2001-2012). Adjusted complementary log-log models were fit to estimate the relative risk of (a) smoking relapse among former smokers (men: n = 4,610; women: n = 1,453); (b) initiation of unhealthy alcohol use (problem drinking and/or drinking over recommended limits) among those with no known history of unhealthy alcohol use (men: n = 8,459; women: n = 4,816); and (c) relapse among those previously reporting unhealthy alcohol use (men: n = 3,487; women: n = 1,318). Men who reported experiencing sexual assault while in the military had sixfold higher risk for smoking relapse: relative risk (RR) = 6.62; 95% confidence interval (CI) [2.34, 18.73], than men who did not. Women who reported experiencing sexual assault while in the military had almost twice the risk for alcohol relapse: RR = 1.73; 95% CI [1.06, 2.83]. There were no other significant associations. These findings suggest that men and women may respond differently following sexual trauma, and support future concerted policy efforts by military leadership to prevent, detect, and intervene on sexual assault.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 6 29%
Researcher 4 19%
Student > Master 3 14%
Lecturer 3 14%
Student > Bachelor 3 14%
Other 2 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 9 43%
Psychology 4 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 19%
Social Sciences 3 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 October 2017.
All research outputs
#7,141,304
of 13,494,857 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Traumatic Stress
#814
of 1,163 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#111,665
of 267,942 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Traumatic Stress
#26
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,494,857 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,163 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,942 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.