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What Does Health Justice Look Like for People Returning from Incarceration?

Overview of attention for article published in The AMA Journal of Ethic, September 2017
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Title
What Does Health Justice Look Like for People Returning from Incarceration?
Published in
The AMA Journal of Ethic, September 2017
DOI 10.1001/journalofethics.2017.19.9.ecas4-1709
Pubmed ID
Abstract

Access to health care is a constitutional right in the United States correctional system, and many incarcerated adults are newly diagnosed with chronic diseases in prison. Despite this right, the quality of correctional health care is variable, largely unmeasured and unregulated, and characterized by patients' widespread distrust of a health system that is intimately tied to a punitive criminal justice system. Upon release, discontinuity of care is the norm, and when continuity is established, it is often hindered by distrust, discrimination, poor communication, and racism in the health system. In this paper, we will propose best practices in transitioning from correctional- to community-based health care and argue that achieving health equity for people with criminal justice involvement in the United States is not possible without ethical provision of health care.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 27%
Unspecified 2 18%
Student > Bachelor 2 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 18%
Researcher 1 9%
Other 1 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 3 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 27%
Social Sciences 2 18%
Psychology 1 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 9%
Other 1 9%