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Use of dried blood spots to define antibody response to the Strongyloides stercoralis recombinant antigen NIE

Overview of attention for article published in Acta Tropica, October 2014
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Title
Use of dried blood spots to define antibody response to the Strongyloides stercoralis recombinant antigen NIE
Published in
Acta Tropica, October 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.actatropica.2014.07.007
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kate Mounsey, Therese Kearns, Melanie Rampton, Stacey Llewellyn, Mallory King, Deborah Holt, Bart J. Currie, Ross Andrews, Thomas Nutman, James McCarthy

Abstract

An approach to improving the diagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis infection is the use of serologic assays utilising the NIE antigen from S. stercoralis, with good diagnostic sensitivity and and excellent specificity reported. Detection of antibody eluted from dried blood spots (DBS) has shown utility in large-scale seroepidemiological studies for a range of conditions and is appealing for use with children where sample collection is difficult. We adapted an existing NIE-Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) for the testing of strongyloides antibody response on DBS, and evaluated it in a population screening and mass drug administration program (MDA) for strongyloidiasis conducted in an Australian indigenous community. Study participants were treated with 200μg/kg ivermectin (>15kg) or 3 x 400mg albendazole (<15kg). The sensitivity of the NIE DBS-ELISA was determined by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis to be 85.7%. A total of 214 DBS were collected from 184 participants across two screening and MDA encounters. A total of 27 of 164 participants (16.5%) tested positive for S. stercoralis NIE-DBS prior to MDA treatment, and 6 of 50 participants (12.0%) tested positive after treatment. These prevalence values are similar to those documented by standard serology in the same community. For 30 participants where a DBS was collected at both MDA 1 and 2, a significant decline in ELISA values was evident post treatment (0.12 to 0.02, p=0.0012). These results are in agreement with previous studies documenting the high seroprevalence of S. stercoralis in remote Australian Indigenous communities, and suggest that collection of dried blood spots may be a useful approach for field diagnosis of S. stercoralis seroprevalence.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 3%
Unknown 33 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 15%
Researcher 5 15%
Student > Bachelor 3 9%
Student > Postgraduate 2 6%
Other 7 21%
Unknown 5 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 35%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 9%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 3%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 5 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 July 2014.
All research outputs
#9,616,421
of 12,018,697 outputs
Outputs from Acta Tropica
#1,359
of 1,813 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#131,398
of 195,071 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Acta Tropica
#15
of 18 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 1,813 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.