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Increased default mode network activity in socially anxious individuals during reward processing

Overview of attention for article published in Biology of Mood & Anxiety Disorders, July 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
16 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
89 Mendeley
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Title
Increased default mode network activity in socially anxious individuals during reward processing
Published in
Biology of Mood & Anxiety Disorders, July 2014
DOI 10.1186/2045-5380-4-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Erin L Maresh, Joseph P Allen, James A Coan

Abstract

Social anxiety has been associated with potentiated negative affect and, more recently, with diminished positive affect. It is unclear how these alterations in negative and positive affect are represented neurally in socially anxious individuals and, further, whether they generalize to non-social stimuli. To explore this, we used a monetary incentive paradigm to explore the association between social anxiety and both the anticipation and consumption of non-social incentives. Eighty-four individuals from a longitudinal community sample underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while participating in a monetary incentive delay (MID) task. The MID task consisted of alternating cues indicating the potential to win or prevent losing varying amounts of money based on the speed of the participant's response. We examined whether self-reported levels of social anxiety, averaged across approximately 7 years of data, moderated brain activity when contrasting gain or loss cues with neutral cues during the anticipation and outcome phases of incentive processing. Whole brain analyses and analyses restricted to the ventral striatum for the anticipation phase and the medial prefrontal cortex for the outcome phase were conducted.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 89 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Unknown 86 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 32 36%
Researcher 12 13%
Student > Master 12 13%
Student > Bachelor 10 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 6%
Other 10 11%
Unknown 8 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 41 46%
Neuroscience 18 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 1%
Other 3 3%
Unknown 15 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 October 2019.
All research outputs
#958,839
of 14,574,667 outputs
Outputs from Biology of Mood & Anxiety Disorders
#11
of 67 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,599
of 193,323 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology of Mood & Anxiety Disorders
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,574,667 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 67 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 193,323 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them