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Nanoplasmonically-Induced Defects in Lipid Membrane Monitored by Ion Current: Transient Nanopores versus Membrane Rupture

Overview of attention for article published in Nano Letters, July 2014
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Title
Nanoplasmonically-Induced Defects in Lipid Membrane Monitored by Ion Current: Transient Nanopores versus Membrane Rupture
Published in
Nano Letters, July 2014
DOI 10.1021/nl500907k
Pubmed ID
Authors

Raghavendra Palankar, Bat-El Pinchasik, Boris N. Khlebtsov, Tatiana A. Kolesnikova, Helmuth Möhwald, Mathias Winterhalter, Andre G. Skirtach

Abstract

We have developed a nanoplasmonic-based approach to induce nanometer-sized local defects in the phospholipid membranes. Here, gold nanorods and nanoparticles having plasmon resonances in the near-infrared (NIR) spectral range are used as optical absorption centers in the lipid membrane. Defects optically induced by NIR-laser irradiation of gold nanoparticles are continuously monitored by high-precision ion conductance measurement. Localized laser-mediated heating of nanorods and nanoparticle aggregates cause either (a) transient nanopores in lipid membranes or (b) irreversible rupture of the membrane. To monitor transient opening and closing, an electrophysiological setup is assembled wherein a giant liposome is spread over a micrometer hole in a glass slide forming a single bilayer of high Ohmic resistance (so-called gigaseal), while laser light is coupled in and focused on the membrane. The energy associated with the localized heating is discussed and compared with typical elastic parameters in the lipid membranes. The method presented here provides a novel methodology for better understanding of transport across artificial or natural biological membranes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 2 4%
Belgium 1 2%
Sweden 1 2%
New Zealand 1 2%
Korea, Republic of 1 2%
Russia 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Japan 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 43 81%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 32%
Researcher 12 23%
Professor 6 11%
Student > Postgraduate 5 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 8 15%
Unknown 2 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Physics and Astronomy 17 32%
Engineering 10 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 15%
Chemistry 6 11%
Materials Science 6 11%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 3 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 July 2014.
All research outputs
#3,023,593
of 4,057,236 outputs
Outputs from Nano Letters
#2,084
of 2,635 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#74,915
of 101,215 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nano Letters
#87
of 124 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,057,236 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,635 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.0. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 101,215 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 124 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.