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Low blood cell counts in wild Japanese monkeys after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, July 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
23 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
twitter
330 tweeters
facebook
31 Facebook pages
googleplus
4 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
50 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
40 Mendeley
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Title
Low blood cell counts in wild Japanese monkeys after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster
Published in
Scientific Reports, July 2014
DOI 10.1038/srep05793
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kazuhiko Ochiai, Shin-ichi Hayama, Sachie Nakiri, Setsuko Nakanishi, Naomi Ishii, Taiki Uno, Takuya Kato, Fumiharu Konno, Yoshi Kawamoto, Shuichi Tsuchida, Toshinori Omi

Abstract

In April 2012 we carried out a 1-year hematological study on a population of wild Japanese monkeys inhabiting the forest area of Fukushima City. This area is located 70 km from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), which released a large amount of radioactive material into the environment following the Great East Japan Earthquake of 2011. For comparison, we examined monkeys inhabiting the Shimokita Peninsula in Aomori Prefecture, located approximately 400 km from the NPP. Total muscle cesium concentration in Fukushima monkeys was in the range of 78-1778 Bq/kg, whereas the level of cesium was below the detection limit in all Shimokita monkeys. Compared with Shimokita monkeys, Fukushima monkeys had significantly low white and red blood cell counts, hemoglobin, and hematocrit, and the white blood cell count in immature monkeys showed a significant negative correlation with muscle cesium concentration. These results suggest that the exposure to some form of radioactive material contributed to hematological changes in Fukushima monkeys.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 330 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 3%
Spain 1 3%
Unknown 38 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 23%
Student > Master 4 10%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Other 2 5%
Other 5 13%
Unknown 6 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 23%
Environmental Science 7 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 15%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 5%
Physics and Astronomy 2 5%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 10 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 478. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 October 2020.
All research outputs
#26,551
of 16,258,335 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#404
of 86,419 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#288
of 195,786 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,258,335 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 86,419 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 195,786 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them