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Effect of a mobile app intervention on vegetable consumption in overweight adults: a randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
31 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
149 Mendeley
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Title
Effect of a mobile app intervention on vegetable consumption in overweight adults: a randomized controlled trial
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12966-017-0563-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah Mummah, Thomas N. Robinson, Maya Mathur, Sarah Farzinkhou, Stephen Sutton, Christopher D. Gardner

Abstract

Mobile applications (apps) have been heralded as transformative tools to deliver behavioral health interventions at scale, but few have been tested in rigorous randomized controlled trials. We tested the effect of a mobile app to increase vegetable consumption among overweight adults attempting weight loss maintenance. Overweight adults (n=135) aged 18-50 years with BMI=28-40 kg/m(2) near Stanford, CA were recruited from an ongoing 12-month weight loss trial (parent trial) and randomly assigned to either the stand-alone, theory-based Vegethon mobile app (enabling goal setting, self-monitoring, and feedback and using "process motivators" including fun, surprise, choice, control, social comparison, and competition) or a wait-listed control condition. The primary outcome was daily vegetables servings, measured by an adapted Harvard food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) 8 weeks post-randomization. Daily vegetable servings from 24-hour dietary recalls, administered by trained, certified, and blinded interviewers 5 weeks post-randomization, was included as a secondary outcome. All analyses were conducted according to principles of intention-to-treat. Daily vegetable consumption was significantly greater in the intervention versus control condition for both measures (adjusted mean difference: 2.0 servings; 95% CI: 0.1, 3.8, p=0.04 for FFQ; and 1.0 servings; 95% CI: 0.2, 1.9; p=0.02 for 24-hour recalls). Baseline vegetable consumption was a significant moderator of intervention effects (p=0.002) in which effects increased as baseline consumption increased. These results demonstrate the efficacy of a mobile app to increase vegetable consumption among overweight adults. Theory-based mobile interventions may present a low-cost, scalable, and effective approach to improving dietary behaviors and preventing associated chronic diseases. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01826591. Registered 27 March 2013.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 31 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 149 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 149 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 40 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 16%
Unspecified 24 16%
Researcher 16 11%
Student > Bachelor 15 10%
Other 30 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 37 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 35 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 12%
Psychology 16 11%
Social Sciences 12 8%
Other 31 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 22. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 June 2019.
All research outputs
#724,253
of 13,465,676 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#338
of 1,364 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,787
of 267,776 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#12
of 36 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,465,676 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,364 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,776 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 36 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.