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Defaunation in the Anthropocene

Overview of attention for article published in Science, July 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

dimensions_citation
2031 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
4687 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
Defaunation in the Anthropocene
Published in
Science, July 2014
DOI 10.1126/science.1251817
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rodolfo Dirzo, Hillary S. Young, Mauro Galetti, Gerardo Ceballos, Nick J. B. Isaac, Ben Collen

Abstract

We live amid a global wave of anthropogenically driven biodiversity loss: species and population extirpations and, critically, declines in local species abundance. Particularly, human impacts on animal biodiversity are an under-recognized form of global environmental change. Among terrestrial vertebrates, 322 species have become extinct since 1500, and populations of the remaining species show 25% average decline in abundance. Invertebrate patterns are equally dire: 67% of monitored populations show 45% mean abundance decline. Such animal declines will cascade onto ecosystem functioning and human well-being. Much remains unknown about this "Anthropocene defaunation"; these knowledge gaps hinder our capacity to predict and limit defaunation impacts. Clearly, however, defaunation is both a pervasive component of the planet's sixth mass extinction and also a major driver of global ecological change.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 545 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 4,687 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 44 <1%
United States 36 <1%
United Kingdom 17 <1%
Mexico 11 <1%
Chile 7 <1%
Australia 7 <1%
Germany 7 <1%
Portugal 7 <1%
Canada 7 <1%
Other 64 1%
Unknown 4480 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 861 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 823 18%
Student > Bachelor 744 16%
Researcher 652 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 223 5%
Other 718 15%
Unknown 666 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2032 43%
Environmental Science 1111 24%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 140 3%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 134 3%
Social Sciences 94 2%
Other 337 7%
Unknown 839 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1884. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 May 2022.
All research outputs
#3,683
of 21,242,513 outputs
Outputs from Science
#233
of 76,377 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22
of 208,307 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science
#2
of 890 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,242,513 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 76,377 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 59.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 208,307 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 890 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.