↓ Skip to main content

Placental malaria and its effect on pregnancy outcomes in Sudanese women from Blue Nile State

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, September 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
79 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Placental malaria and its effect on pregnancy outcomes in Sudanese women from Blue Nile State
Published in
Malaria Journal, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12936-017-2028-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Samia A. Omer, Hagir E. Idress, Ishag Adam, Mutasim Abdelrahim, Ali N. Noureldein, Abdelrahim M. Abdelrazig, Mohammed O. Elhassan, Suad M. Sulaiman

Abstract

Malaria infection during pregnancy can result in placental malaria and is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes particularly among primigravidae. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and risk factors for placental malaria and its effect on pregnancy outcomes in Blue Nile state, Sudan. A cross-sectional hospital-based study was conducted consecutively during January 2012-December 2015 in three main hospitals in Blue Nile State, Sudan. At delivery, peripheral and placental blood samples were collected from consenting women. Finger prick blood was used for preparation of peripheral smears and for haemoglobin measurement. Smears were stained with Giemsa and examined microscopically for malaria parasites. Pregnancy outcomes in association to placental malaria were investigated. A total of 1149 mothers and their newborns were recruited. The mean (SD) of the age was 23.3 (5.2) years. Detection of malaria parasites was confirmed in 37.8% of the peripheral blood films and 59.3% of the placental films with Plasmodium falciparum as the only species detected. In multivariate analysis, younger age ≤23.2 years old (AOR = 3.2, 95% CI 1.9-5.5; P < 0.001), primiparae (AOR = 3.9, CI 2.1-7.6; P < 0.001), secundiparae (AOR = 2.8, 95% CI 1.5-5.1; P < 0.001, no antenatal care (ANC) visits (AOR = 11.9, 95% CI 7.8-18.1; P < 0.001) and not using bed nets (AOR = 3.5, 95% CI 1.7-6.8; P < 0.001) were risk factors for placental malaria. Education and residence were not associated with placental malaria infection. Placental malaria was significantly associated with maternal anaemia (AOR = 41.6, 95% CI 23.3-74.4; P < 0.001) and low birth weight (LBW) (AOR = 25.2, 95% CI 15.1-41.3; P < 0.001). During the study, there was a high prevalence of placental malaria in Blue Nile State-Sudan, as the enhanced control activities were not practiced, leading to adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as maternal anaemia and LBW.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 79 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 79 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 24 30%
Student > Bachelor 17 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 9%
Researcher 6 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 6%
Other 9 11%
Unknown 11 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 28 35%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 7 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 5%
Other 12 15%
Unknown 13 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 September 2017.
All research outputs
#7,049,003
of 11,779,850 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#2,420
of 3,457 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#126,487
of 241,172 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#117
of 126 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,779,850 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,457 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 241,172 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 126 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.