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Nutrient Sources and Transport in the Missouri River Basin, with Emphasis on the Effects of Irrigation and Reservoirs1

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the American Water Resources Association, August 2011
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Title
Nutrient Sources and Transport in the Missouri River Basin, with Emphasis on the Effects of Irrigation and Reservoirs1
Published in
Journal of the American Water Resources Association, August 2011
DOI 10.1111/j.1752-1688.2011.00584.x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Juliane B. Brown, Lori A. Sprague, Jean A. Dupree

Abstract

SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes (SPARROW) models were used to relate instream nutrient loads to sources and factors influencing the transport of nutrients in the Missouri River Basin. Agricultural inputs from fertilizer and manure were the largest nutrient sources throughout a large part of the basin, although atmospheric and urban inputs were important sources in some areas. Sediment mobilized from stream channels was a source of phosphorus in medium and larger streams. Irrigation on agricultural land was estimated to decrease the nitrogen load reaching the Mississippi River by as much as 17%, likely as a result of increased anoxia and denitrification in the soil zone. Approximately 16% of the nitrogen load and 33% of the phosphorus load that would have otherwise reached the Mississippi River was retained in reservoirs and lakes throughout the basin. Nearly half of the total attenuation occurred in the eight largest water bodies. Unlike the other major tributary basins, nearly the entire instream nutrient load leaving the outlet of the Platte and Kansas River subbasins reached the Mississippi River. Most of the larger reservoirs and lakes in the Platte River subbasin are upstream of the major sources, whereas in the Kansas River subbasin, most of the source inputs are in the southeast part of the subbasin where characteristics of the area and proximity to the Missouri River facilitate delivery of nutrients to the Mississippi River.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 4%
Italy 1 2%
Unknown 47 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 24%
Student > Master 9 18%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 8%
Student > Postgraduate 3 6%
Other 8 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 23 46%
Engineering 8 16%
Unspecified 7 14%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 5 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 10%
Other 2 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 September 2011.
All research outputs
#10,438,019
of 13,089,117 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the American Water Resources Association
#597
of 715 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#71,843
of 91,761 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the American Water Resources Association
#7
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,089,117 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 715 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 91,761 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.