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Internal Diversification of Mitochondrial Haplogroup R0a Reveals Post-Last Glacial Maximum Demographic Expansions in South Arabia

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Biology and Evolution, July 2010
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Citations

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43 Dimensions

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44 Mendeley
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Title
Internal Diversification of Mitochondrial Haplogroup R0a Reveals Post-Last Glacial Maximum Demographic Expansions in South Arabia
Published in
Molecular Biology and Evolution, July 2010
DOI 10.1093/molbev/msq178
Pubmed ID
Authors

V. Cerny, C. J. Mulligan, V. Fernandes, N. M. Silva, F. Alshamali, A. Non, N. Harich, L. Cherni, A. B. A. El Gaaied, A. Al-Meeri, L. Pereira

Abstract

Widespread interest in the first successful Out of Africa dispersal of modern humans ∼60-80 thousand years ago via a southern migration route has overshadowed the study of later periods of South Arabian prehistory. In this work, we show that the post-Last Glacial Maximum period of the past 20,000 years, during which climatic conditions were becoming more hospitable, has been a significant time in the formation of the extant genetic composition and population structure of this region. This conclusion is supported by the internal diversification displayed in the highly resolved phylogenetic tree of 89 whole mitochondrial genomes (71 being newly presented here) for haplogroup R0a-the most frequent and widespread haplogroup in Arabia. Additionally, two geographically specific clades (R0a1a1a and R0a2f1) have been identified in non-Arabic speaking peoples such as the Soqotri and Mahri living in the southern part of the Arabian Peninsula where a past refugium was identified by independent archaeological studies. Estimates of time to the most recent common ancestor of these lineages match the earliest archaeological evidence for seafaring activity in the peninsula in the sixth millennium BC.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Tunisia 1 2%
Unknown 43 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 32%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 25%
Student > Master 5 11%
Professor 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 2 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 29 66%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 9%
Environmental Science 2 5%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 2%
Psychology 1 2%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 3 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 December 2018.
All research outputs
#10,894,066
of 17,455,239 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Biology and Evolution
#3,547
of 4,299 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#102,598
of 200,107 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Biology and Evolution
#62
of 73 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,455,239 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,299 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.9. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 200,107 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 73 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.