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Primary cilium-associated genes mediate bone marrow stromal cell response to hypoxia

Overview of attention for article published in Stem Cell Research, September 2014
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
29 Mendeley
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Title
Primary cilium-associated genes mediate bone marrow stromal cell response to hypoxia
Published in
Stem Cell Research, September 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.scr.2014.06.006
Pubmed ID
Authors

James A.L. Brown, Tapesh Santra, Peter Owens, Aline M. Morrison, Frank Barry

Abstract

Currently there is intense interest in using mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) for therapeutic interventions in many diseases and conditions. To accelerate the therapeutic use of stem cells we must understand how they sense their environment. Primary cilia are an extracellular sensory organelle present on most growth arrested cells that transduce information about the cellular environment into cells, triggering signaling cascades that have profound effects on development, cell cycle, proliferation, differentiation and migration. Migrating cells likely encounter differing oxygen tensions, therefore we investigated the effect of oxygen tension on cilia. Using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) we found that oxygen tension significantly affected the length of cilia in primary BMSCs. Chronic exposure to hypoxia specifically down-regulated genes involved in hedgehog signaling and re-localized the Smo and Gli2 proteins to cilia. Investigating the effects of chemotactic migration on cilia, we observed significantly longer cilia in migrating cells which was again, strongly influenced by oxygen tension. Finally, using computational modeling we identified links between migration and ciliation signaling pathways, characterizing the novel role of HSP90 and PI3K signaling in regulating BMSC cilia length. These findings enhance our current understanding of BMSC adaptions to hypoxia and advance our knowledge of BMSC biology and cilia regulation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 28%
Student > Master 5 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 14%
Professor 3 10%
Lecturer 1 3%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 5 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 17%
Engineering 2 7%
Computer Science 1 3%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 7 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 May 2015.
All research outputs
#6,913,690
of 12,018,607 outputs
Outputs from Stem Cell Research
#312
of 763 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#84,210
of 194,261 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stem Cell Research
#12
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,018,607 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 763 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 194,261 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.