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Fibroblasts From Longer-Lived Species of Primates, Rodents, Bats, Carnivores, and Birds Resist Protein Damage

Overview of attention for article published in Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences & Medical Sciences, July 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
31 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
33 Mendeley
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Title
Fibroblasts From Longer-Lived Species of Primates, Rodents, Bats, Carnivores, and Birds Resist Protein Damage
Published in
Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences & Medical Sciences, July 2014
DOI 10.1093/gerona/glu115
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew M. Pickering, Marcus Lehr, William J. Kohler, Melissa L. Han, Richard A. Miller

Abstract

Species differ greatly in their rates of aging. Among mammalian species life span ranges from 2 to over 60 years. Here, we test the hypothesis that skin-derived fibroblasts from long-lived species of animals differ from those of short-lived animals in their defenses against protein damage. In parallel studies of rodents, nonhuman primates, birds, and species from the Laurasiatheria superorder (bats, carnivores, shrews, and ungulates), we find associations between species longevity and resistance of proteins to oxidative stress after exposure to H2O2 or paraquat. In addition, baseline levels of protein carbonyl appear to be higher in cells from shorter-lived mammals compared with longer-lived mammals. Thus, resistance to protein oxidation is associated with species maximal life span in independent clades of mammals, suggesting that this cellular property may be required for evolution of longevity. Evaluation of the properties of primary fibroblast cell lines can provide insights into the factors that regulate the pace of aging across species of mammals.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 24%
Other 5 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 9%
Student > Master 3 9%
Other 7 21%
Unknown 3 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 3%
Unspecified 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 6 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 September 2014.
All research outputs
#837,233
of 10,373,475 outputs
Outputs from Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences & Medical Sciences
#291
of 1,966 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,101
of 184,869 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences & Medical Sciences
#13
of 41 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,373,475 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,966 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 184,869 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 41 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.