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Solar and Temporal Effects on Escherichia coli Concentration at a Lake Michigan Swimming Beach

Overview of attention for article published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, July 2004
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Title
Solar and Temporal Effects on Escherichia coli Concentration at a Lake Michigan Swimming Beach
Published in
Applied and Environmental Microbiology, July 2004
DOI 10.1128/aem.70.7.4276-4285.2004
Pubmed ID
Authors

R. L. Whitman, M. B. Nevers, G. C. Korinek, M. N. Byappanahalli

Abstract

Studies on solar inactivation of Escherichia coli in freshwater and in situ have been limited. At 63rd St. Beach, Chicago, Ill., factors influencing the daily periodicity of culturable E. coli, particularly insolation, were examined. Water samples for E. coli analysis were collected twice daily between April and September 2000 three times a week along five transects in two depths of water. Hydrometeorological conditions were continuously logged: UV radiation, total insolation, wind speed and direction, wave height, and relative lake level. On 10 days, transects were sampled hourly from 0700 to 1500 h. The effect of sunlight on E. coli inactivation was evaluated with dark and transparent in situ mesocosms and ambient lake water. For the study, the number of E. coli samples collected (n) was 2,676. During sunny days, E. coli counts decreased exponentially with day length and exposure to insolation, but on cloudy days, E. coli inactivation was diminished; the E. coli decay rate was strongly influenced by initial concentration. In situ experiments confirmed that insolation primarily inactivated E. coli; UV radiation only marginally affected E. coli concentration. The relationship between insolation and E. coli density is complicated by relative lake level, wave height, and turbidity, all of which are often products of wind vector. Continuous importation and nighttime replenishment of E. coli were evident. These findings (i) suggest that solar inactivation is an important mechanism for natural reduction of indicator bacteria in large freshwater bodies and (ii) have implications for management strategies of nontidal waters and the use of E. coli as an indicator organism.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 108 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 6%
Uganda 1 <1%
Unknown 101 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 28%
Student > Master 20 19%
Researcher 18 17%
Student > Bachelor 13 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 6%
Other 21 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 35 32%
Environmental Science 34 31%
Engineering 13 12%
Unspecified 8 7%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 6 6%
Other 12 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 August 2014.
All research outputs
#11,124,502
of 12,508,562 outputs
Outputs from Applied and Environmental Microbiology
#8,967
of 9,509 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#159,021
of 193,335 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Applied and Environmental Microbiology
#118
of 145 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,508,562 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,509 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 193,335 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 145 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.