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Disturbance of the gut microbiota in early-life selectively affects visceral pain in adulthood without impacting cognitive or anxiety-related behaviors in male rats

Overview of attention for article published in Neuroscience, September 2014
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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14 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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173 Dimensions

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297 Mendeley
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Title
Disturbance of the gut microbiota in early-life selectively affects visceral pain in adulthood without impacting cognitive or anxiety-related behaviors in male rats
Published in
Neuroscience, September 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2014.07.054
Pubmed ID
Authors

S.M. O’Mahony, V.D. Felice, K. Nally, H.M. Savignac, M.J. Claesson, P. Scully, J. Woznicki, N.P. Hyland, F. Shanahan, E.M. Quigley, J.R. Marchesi, P.W. O’Toole, T.G. Dinan, J.F. Cryan

Abstract

Disruption of bacterial colonization during the early postnatal period is increasingly being linked to adverse health outcomes. Indeed, there is a growing appreciation that the gut microbiota plays a role in neurodevelopment. However, there is a paucity of information on the consequences of early-life manipulations of the gut microbiota on behavior. To this end we administered an antibiotic (vancomycin) from postnatal days 4-13 to male rat pups and assessed behavioral and physiological measures across all aspects of the brain-gut axis. In addition, we sought to confirm and expand the effects of early-life antibiotic treatment using a different antibiotic strategy (a cocktail of primaricin, bacitracin, neomycin; orally) during the same time period in both female and males rat pups. Vancomycin significantly altered the microbiota, which was restored to control levels by eight weeks of age. Notably, vancomycin treated animals displayed visceral hypersensitivity in adulthood without any significant effect on anxiety responses as assessed in the elevated plus maze or open field tests. Moreover, cognitive performance in the Morris water maze was not affected by early-life dysbiosis. Immune and stress-related physiological responses were equally unaffected. The early-life antibiotic-induced visceral hypersensitivity was also observed in male rats given the antibiotic cocktail. Both treatments did not alter visceral pain perception in female rats. Changes in visceral pain perception in males were paralleled by distinct decreases in the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1, the α-2A adrenergic receptor and cholecystokinin B receptor. In conclusion, a temporary disruption of the gut microbiota in early-life results in very specific and long-lasting changes in visceral sensitivity in male rats, a hallmark of stress-related functional disorders of the brain-gut axis such as irritable bowel disorder.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 297 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 1%
Ireland 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Unknown 289 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 58 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 53 18%
Student > Bachelor 38 13%
Researcher 37 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 19 6%
Other 58 20%
Unknown 34 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 58 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 55 19%
Neuroscience 36 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 23 8%
Psychology 18 6%
Other 55 19%
Unknown 52 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 April 2019.
All research outputs
#2,732,105
of 15,881,336 outputs
Outputs from Neuroscience
#814
of 6,496 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#33,934
of 195,982 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuroscience
#17
of 101 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,881,336 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,496 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 195,982 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 101 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.