↓ Skip to main content

Bat flight and zoonotic viruses.

Overview of attention for article published in Emerging Infectious Diseases, May 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
102 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
1 Google+ user
video
5 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
105 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
365 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Bat flight and zoonotic viruses.
Published in
Emerging Infectious Diseases, May 2014
DOI 10.3201/eid2005.130539
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas J. O’Shea, Paul M. Cryan, Andrew A. Cunningham, Anthony R. Fooks, David T.S. Hayman, Angela D. Luis, Alison J. Peel, Raina K. Plowright, James L.N. Wood, O'Shea TJ, Cryan PM, Cunningham AA, Fooks AR, Hayman DT, Luis AD, Peel AJ, Plowright RK, Wood JL, T. J. O’Shea et al.

Abstract

Bats are sources of high viral diversity and high-profile zoonotic viruses worldwide. Although apparently not pathogenic in their reservoir hosts, some viruses from bats severely affect other mammals, including humans. Examples include severe acute respiratory syndrome coronaviruses, Ebola and Marburg viruses, and Nipah and Hendra viruses. Factors underlying high viral diversity in bats are the subject of speculation. We hypothesize that flight, a factor common to all bats but to no other mammals, provides an intensive selective force for coexistence with viral parasites through a daily cycle that elevates metabolism and body temperature analogous to the febrile response in other mammals. On an evolutionary scale, this host-virus interaction might have resulted in the large diversity of zoonotic viruses in bats, possibly through bat viruses adapting to be more tolerant of the fever response and less virulent to their natural hosts.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 102 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 365 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 8 2%
United Kingdom 5 1%
Mexico 3 <1%
France 2 <1%
Canada 2 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Nigeria 1 <1%
Other 2 <1%
Unknown 339 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 70 19%
Researcher 63 17%
Student > Master 61 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 59 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 22 6%
Other 90 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 155 42%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 38 10%
Unspecified 34 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 33 9%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 27 7%
Other 78 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 144. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 June 2018.
All research outputs
#95,606
of 13,099,076 outputs
Outputs from Emerging Infectious Diseases
#97
of 6,559 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,572
of 192,741 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Emerging Infectious Diseases
#2
of 128 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,099,076 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,559 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 192,741 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 128 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.