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Organic preservation of fossil musculature with ultracellular detail

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, October 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

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26 Dimensions

Readers on

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77 Mendeley
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Title
Organic preservation of fossil musculature with ultracellular detail
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, October 2009
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2009.1378
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maria McNamara, Patrick J. Orr, Stuart L. Kearns, Luis Alcalá, Pere Anadón, Enrique Peñalver-Mollá

Abstract

The very labile (decay-prone), non-biomineralized, tissues of organisms are rarely fossilized. Occurrences thereof are invaluable supplements to a body fossil record dominated by biomineralized tissues, which alone are extremely unrepresentative of diversity in modern and ancient ecosystems. Fossil examples of extremely labile tissues (e.g. muscle) that exhibit a high degree of morphological fidelity are almost invariably replicated by inorganic compounds such as calcium phosphate. There is no consensus as to whether such tissues can be preserved with similar morphological fidelity as organic remains, except when enclosed inside amber. Here, we report fossilized musculature from an approximately 18 Myr old salamander from lacustrine sediments of Ribesalbes, Spain. The muscle is preserved organically, in three dimensions, and with the highest fidelity of morphological preservation yet documented from the fossil record. Preserved ultrastructural details include myofilaments, endomysium, layering within the sarcolemma, and endomysial circulatory vessels infilled with blood. Slight differences between the fossil tissues and their counterparts in extant amphibians reflect limited degradation during fossilization. Our results provide unequivocal evidence that high-fidelity organic preservation of extremely labile tissues is not only feasible, but likely to be common. This is supported by the discovery of similarly preserved tissues in the Eocene Grube Messel biota.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 4 5%
Argentina 2 3%
United States 2 3%
South Africa 1 1%
Sweden 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Italy 1 1%
Netherlands 1 1%
Unknown 64 83%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 29%
Researcher 16 21%
Student > Bachelor 11 14%
Student > Master 6 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 8%
Other 13 17%
Unknown 3 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 42 55%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 30%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Psychology 1 1%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 1%
Other 4 5%
Unknown 4 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 November 2009.
All research outputs
#2,005,199
of 12,364,029 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#3,815
of 7,253 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,292
of 201,080 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#79
of 115 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,364,029 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,253 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.5. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 201,080 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 115 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.