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Tissue memory in healing tendons: short loading episodes stimulate healing

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Applied Physiology, January 2009
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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34 Mendeley
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Title
Tissue memory in healing tendons: short loading episodes stimulate healing
Published in
Journal of Applied Physiology, January 2009
DOI 10.1152/japplphysiol.00414.2009
Pubmed ID
Authors

Therese Andersson, Pernilla Eliasson, Per Aspenberg

Abstract

Intact tendons adapt slowly to changes in mechanical loading, whereas in healing tendons the effect of mechanical loading or its absence is dramatic. The longevity of the response to a single loading episode is, however, unknown. We hypothesized that the tissue has a "memory" of loading episodes and that therefore short loadings are sufficient to elicit improved healing. The Achilles tendon of 70 female rats was transected and unloaded by tail suspension for 12 days (suspension started on day 2 after surgery). Each day, the rats were let down from suspension for short daily training episodes according to different regimes: 15 min of cage activity or treadmill running for 15, 30, 60, or 2x15 min. Rats with transected Achilles tendons and full-time cage activity served as controls. The results demonstrated that full-time cage activity increased the peak force over three times compared with unloading. Short daily loading episodes (treadmill running) increased the peak force about half as much as full-time activity. Prolongation of treadmill running above 15 min or dividing the daily training in two separate episodes had minimal further effect. This mechanical stimulation increased the cross-sectional area but had no effect on the mechanical properties of the repair tissue. The findings indicate that once the tissue had received information from a certain loading type and level, this is "memorized" and leads to a response lasting many hours. This suggests that patients might be allowed early short loading episodes following, e.g., an Achilles tendon rupture for a better outcome.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Denmark 1 3%
Norway 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Unknown 31 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 29%
Student > Master 8 24%
Researcher 5 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 6%
Other 5 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 32%
Engineering 7 21%
Unspecified 5 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 15%
Sports and Recreations 4 12%
Other 2 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 July 2015.
All research outputs
#2,198,535
of 5,366,972 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Applied Physiology
#1,518
of 2,890 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#47,219
of 132,275 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Applied Physiology
#25
of 41 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,366,972 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 58th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,890 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 132,275 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 41 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.