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Ecological consequences of the expansion of N2-fixing plants in cold biomes

Overview of attention for article published in Oecologia, June 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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35 Dimensions

Readers on

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122 Mendeley
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Title
Ecological consequences of the expansion of N2-fixing plants in cold biomes
Published in
Oecologia, June 2014
DOI 10.1007/s00442-014-2991-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Erika Hiltbrunner, Rien Aerts, Tobias Bühlmann, Kerstin Huss-Danell, Borgthor Magnusson, David D. Myrold, Sasha C. Reed, Bjarni D. Sigurdsson, Christian Körner

Abstract

Research in warm-climate biomes has shown that invasion by symbiotic dinitrogen (N2)-fixing plants can transform ecosystems in ways analogous to the transformations observed as a consequence of anthropogenic, atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition: declines in biodiversity, soil acidification, and alterations to carbon and nutrient cycling, including increased N losses through nitrate leaching and emissions of the powerful greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). Here, we used literature review and case study approaches to assess the evidence for similar transformations in cold-climate ecosystems of the boreal, subarctic and upper montane-temperate life zones. Our assessment focuses on the plant genera Lupinus and Alnus, which have become invasive largely as a consequence of deliberate introductions and/or reduced land management. These cold biomes are commonly located in remote areas with low anthropogenic N inputs, and the environmental impacts of N2-fixer invasion appear to be as severe as those from anthropogenic N deposition in highly N polluted areas. Hence, inputs of N from N2 fixation can affect ecosystems as dramatically or even more strongly than N inputs from atmospheric deposition, and biomes in cold climates represent no exception with regard to the risk of being invaded by N2-fixing species. In particular, the cold biomes studied here show both a strong potential to be transformed by N2-fixing plants and a rapid subsequent saturation in the ecosystem's capacity to retain N. Therefore, analogous to increases in N deposition, N2-fixing plant invasions must be deemed significant threats to biodiversity and to environmental quality.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 122 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Iceland 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 116 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 29 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 22%
Student > Master 23 19%
Student > Bachelor 14 11%
Professor 6 5%
Other 10 8%
Unknown 13 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 49 40%
Environmental Science 26 21%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 9 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 2%
Other 7 6%
Unknown 23 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 October 2014.
All research outputs
#3,645,849
of 13,181,286 outputs
Outputs from Oecologia
#894
of 2,826 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#50,982
of 199,115 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Oecologia
#16
of 50 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,181,286 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,826 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 199,115 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 50 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.