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Resistance of galactoside-terminated alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers to marine fouling organisms

Overview of attention for article published in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, September 2011
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

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Title
Resistance of galactoside-terminated alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers to marine fouling organisms
Published in
ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, September 2011
DOI 10.1021/am200726a
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas Ederth, Tobias Ekblad, Michala E. Petitt, Sheelagh L. Conlan, Chun-Xia Du, Maureen E. Callow, James A. Callow, Robert J. Mutton, Anthony Clare, Fraddry D’Souza, Glen T. Donnelly, Anouk Bruin, Peter R. Willemsen, X Y Su, Su Wang, Qi Zhao, Markus Hederos, Peter Konradsson, Bo Lieberg

Abstract

Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of galactoside-terminated alkanethiols have protein-resistance properties which can be tuned via the degree of methylation [Langmuir 2005, 21, 2971-2980]. Specifically, a partially methylated compound was more resistant to nonspecific protein adsorption than the hydroxylated or fully methylated counterparts. We investigate whether this also holds true for resistance to the attachment and adhesion of a range of marine species, in order to clarify to what extent resistance to protein adsorption correlates with the more complex adhesion of fouling organisms. The partially methylated galactoside-terminated SAM was further compared to a mixed monolayer of ω-substituted methyl- and hydroxyl-terminated alkanethiols with wetting properties and surface ratio of hydroxyl to methyl groups matching that of the galactoside. The settlement (initial attachment) and adhesion strength of four model marine fouling organisms were investigated, representing both micro- and macrofoulers; two bacteria (Cobetia marina and Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus), barnacle cypris larvae (Balanus amphitrite), and algal zoospores (Ulva linza). The minimum in protein adsorption onto the partially methylated galactoside surface was partly reproduced in the marine fouling assays, providing some support for a relationship between protein resistance and adhesion of marine fouling organisms. The mixed alkanethiol SAM, which was matched in wettability to the partially methylated galactoside SAM, consistently showed higher settlement (initial attachment) of test organisms than the galactoside, implying that both wettability and surface chemistry are insufficient to explain differences in fouling resistance. We suggest that differences in the structure of interfacial water may explain the variation in adhesion to these SAMs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 4%
United Kingdom 1 4%
Japan 1 4%
Unknown 23 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 27%
Researcher 7 27%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 12%
Lecturer 2 8%
Other 2 8%
Other 5 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Chemistry 8 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 27%
Materials Science 3 12%
Unspecified 2 8%
Sports and Recreations 2 8%
Other 4 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 September 2011.
All research outputs
#816,018
of 3,622,349 outputs
Outputs from ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
#132
of 978 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,816
of 60,752 outputs
Outputs of similar age from ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
#4
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,622,349 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 63rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 978 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 60,752 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.