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Decomposition and nitrogen dynamics of 15N-labeled leaf, root, and twig litter in temperate coniferous forests

Overview of attention for article published in Oecologia, July 2013
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Title
Decomposition and nitrogen dynamics of 15N-labeled leaf, root, and twig litter in temperate coniferous forests
Published in
Oecologia, July 2013
DOI 10.1007/s00442-013-2706-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tiff L. van Huysen, Mark E. Harmon, Steven S. Perakis, Hua Chen

Abstract

Litter nutrient dynamics contribute significantly to biogeochemical cycling in forest ecosystems. We examined how site environment and initial substrate quality influence decomposition and nitrogen (N) dynamics of multiple litter types. A 2.5-year decomposition study was installed in the Oregon Coast Range and West Cascades using (15)N-labeled litter from Acer macrophyllum, Picea sitchensis, and Pseudotsuga menziesii. Mass loss for leaf litter was similar between the two sites, while root and twig litter exhibited greater mass loss in the Coast Range. Mass loss was greatest from leaves and roots, and species differences in mass loss were more prominent in the Coast Range. All litter types and species mineralized N early in the decomposition process; only A. macrophyllum leaves exhibited a net N immobilization phase. There were no site differences with respect to litter N dynamics despite differences in site N availability, and litter N mineralization patterns were species-specific. For multiple litter × species combinations, the difference between gross and net N mineralization was significant, and gross mineralization was 7-20 % greater than net mineralization. The mineralization results suggest that initial litter chemistry may be an important driver of litter N dynamics. Our study demonstrates that greater amounts of N are cycling through these systems than may be quantified by only measuring net mineralization and challenges current leaf-based biogeochemical theory regarding patterns of N immobilization and mineralization.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 2%
Mexico 1 2%
Denmark 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 52 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 25%
Researcher 11 20%
Student > Master 11 20%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Other 3 5%
Other 9 16%
Unknown 4 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 43%
Environmental Science 20 36%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 7%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Materials Science 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 5 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 August 2014.
All research outputs
#3,053,454
of 4,507,652 outputs
Outputs from Oecologia
#1,378
of 1,577 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#73,670
of 113,793 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Oecologia
#83
of 92 outputs
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