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Financial incentives for increasing uptake of HPV vaccinations: A randomized controlled trial.

Overview of attention for article published in Health Psychology, February 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
13 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
facebook
7 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
82 Mendeley
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Title
Financial incentives for increasing uptake of HPV vaccinations: A randomized controlled trial.
Published in
Health Psychology, February 2015
DOI 10.1037/hea0000088
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eleni Mantzari, Florian Vogt, Theresa M. Marteau

Abstract

Objective: Uptake of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccinations by 17- to 18-year-old girls in England is below (<35%) target (80%). This trial assesses (a) the impact of financial incentives on uptake and completion of an HPV vaccination program, and (b) whether impacts are moderated by participants' deprivation level. It also assesses the impact of incentives on decision quality to get vaccinated, as measured by attitudes toward the vaccination and knowledge of its consequences. Method: One thousand 16- to 18-year-old girls were invited to participate in an HPV vaccination program: 500 previously uninvited, and 500 unresponsive to previous invitations. Girls randomly received either a standard invitation letter or a letter including the offer of vouchers worth £45 (€56; $73) for undergoing 3 vaccinations. Girls attending their first vaccination appointment completed a questionnaire assessing decision quality to be vaccinated. Outcomes were uptake of the first and third vaccinations and decision quality. Results: The intervention increased uptake of the first (first-time invitees: 28.4% vs. 19.6%, odds ratio [OR] = 1.63, 95% confidence interval [CI; 1.08, 2.47]; previous nonattenders: 23.6% vs. 10.4%, OR = 2.65, 95% CI [1.61, 4.38]) and third (first-time invitees: 22.4% vs. 12%, OR = 2.15, 95% CI [1.32, 3.50]; previous nonattenders: 12.4% vs. 3%, OR = 4.28, 95% CI [1.92, 9.55]) vaccinations. Impacts were not moderated by deprivation level. Decision quality was unaffected by the intervention. Conclusions: Although the intervention increased completion of HPV vaccinations, uptake remained lower than the national target, which, in addition to cost effectiveness and acceptability issues, necessitates consideration of other ways of achieving it. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 82 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Tanzania, United Republic of 1 1%
Australia 1 1%
Unknown 78 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 13 16%
Researcher 13 16%
Student > Bachelor 12 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 15%
Student > Master 11 13%
Other 21 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 23%
Unspecified 16 20%
Psychology 14 17%
Social Sciences 10 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 10%
Other 15 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 September 2016.
All research outputs
#1,347,564
of 13,293,718 outputs
Outputs from Health Psychology
#296
of 2,425 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,835
of 199,558 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Health Psychology
#16
of 47 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,293,718 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,425 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 199,558 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 47 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.