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Molecular evidence for ongoing complementarity and horizontal gene transfer in endosymbiotic systems of mealybugs

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Microbiology, August 2014
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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30 Mendeley
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Title
Molecular evidence for ongoing complementarity and horizontal gene transfer in endosymbiotic systems of mealybugs
Published in
Frontiers in Microbiology, August 2014
DOI 10.3389/fmicb.2014.00449
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sergio López-Madrigal, Aleixandre Beltrà, Serena Resurrección, Antonia Soto, Amparo Latorre, Andrés Moya, Rosario Gil

Abstract

Intracellular bacterial supply of essential amino acids is common among sap-feeding insects, thus complementing the scarcity of nitrogenous compounds in plant phloem. This is also the role of the two mealybug endosymbiotic systems whose genomes have been sequenced. In the nested endosymbiotic system from Planococcus citri (Pseudococcinae), "Candidatus Tremblaya princeps" and "Candidatus Moranella endobia" cooperate to synthesize essential amino acids, while in Phenacoccus avenae (Phenacoccinae) this function is performed by its single endosymbiont "Candidatus Tremblaya phenacola." However, little is known regarding the evolution of essential amino acid supplementation strategies in other mealybug systems. To address this knowledge gap, we screened for the presence of six selected loci involved in essential amino acid biosynthesis in five additional mealybug species. We found evidence of ongoing complementarity among endosymbionts from insects of subfamily Pseudococcinae, as well as horizontal gene transfer affecting endosymbionts from insects of family Phenacoccinae, providing a more comprehensive picture of the evolutionary history of these endosymbiotic systems. Additionally, we report two diagnostic motifs to help identify invasive mealybug species.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 3%
Czechia 1 3%
Unknown 28 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 40%
Researcher 3 10%
Professor 3 10%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 7%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 53%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 7%
Sports and Recreations 1 3%
Physics and Astronomy 1 3%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 7 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 November 2016.
All research outputs
#8,211,776
of 15,569,608 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Microbiology
#5,380
of 13,992 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#77,017
of 202,211 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Microbiology
#75
of 162 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,569,608 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 13,992 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 202,211 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 162 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.