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No Impact of Calorie or Unit Information on Ad Libitum Alcohol Consumption

Overview of attention for article published in Alcohol & Alcoholism, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

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49 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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34 Mendeley
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Title
No Impact of Calorie or Unit Information on Ad Libitum Alcohol Consumption
Published in
Alcohol & Alcoholism, September 2017
DOI 10.1093/alcalc/agx066
Pubmed ID
Authors

Olivia M Maynard, Tess Langfield, Angela S Attwood, Emily Allen, Imogen Drew, Alex Votier, Marcus R Munafò

Abstract

To investigate the impact of unit and calorie information on drinking behaviour in an ad libitum taste test paradigm. In this experimental human laboratory study, participants were randomized to one of four conditions, balanced by gender, using a 2 (unit information: present vs. absent) × 2 (calorie information: present vs. absent) between-subjects design. The percentage of beer consumed during the taste test was the primary outcome measure. Among this largely undergraduate student population, we found no evidence that either unit or calorie information impacted alcohol consumption in an ad libitum taste test. A manipulation check indicated that few of the participants receiving either unit and/or calorie information could accurately recall the number of units and/or calories in the beverages provided to them, indicating low levels of engagement with this information. Analysis of qualitative reactions to calorie and unit labelling indicated possible negative unintended consequences of calorie and unit information, including using unit information to facilitate consumption of higher strength beverages, and calorie information to reduce food consumption prior to a drinking episode. We find no evidence to support an effect of unit or calorie information, a public-health initiative supported by the alcohol industry, on drinking behaviour. It is possible that compulsory unit and calorie labelling, at least in the numeric format used here, would have no effect on alcohol intake and may even have some negative unintended consequences among certain populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 49 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 9 26%
Researcher 7 21%
Professor 6 18%
Student > Master 4 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 12%
Other 4 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 11 32%
Unspecified 9 26%
Computer Science 6 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 18%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Other 1 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 31. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 December 2017.
All research outputs
#519,112
of 13,255,714 outputs
Outputs from Alcohol & Alcoholism
#66
of 1,426 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#19,819
of 269,782 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Alcohol & Alcoholism
#4
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,255,714 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,426 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,782 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.