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Do cities simulate climate change? A comparison of herbivore response to urban and global warming

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, August 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
20 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
51 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
168 Mendeley
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Title
Do cities simulate climate change? A comparison of herbivore response to urban and global warming
Published in
Global Change Biology, August 2014
DOI 10.1111/gcb.12692
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elsa Youngsteadt, Adam G. Dale, Adam J. Terando, Robert R. Dunn, Steven D. Frank

Abstract

Cities experience elevated temperature, CO2 , and nitrogen deposition decades ahead of the global average, such that biological response to urbanization may predict response to future climate change. This hypothesis remains untested due to a lack of complementary urban and long-term observations. Here, we examine the response of an herbivore, the scale insect Melanaspis tenebricosa, to temperature in the context of an urban heat island, a series of historical temperature fluctuations, and recent climate warming. We survey M. tenebricosa on 55 urban street trees in Raleigh, NC, 342 herbarium specimens collected in the rural southeastern United States from 1895 to 2011, and at 20 rural forest sites represented by both modern (2013) and historical samples. We relate scale insect abundance to August temperatures and find that M. tenebricosa is most common in the hottest parts of the city, on historical specimens collected during warm time periods, and in present-day rural forests compared to the same sites when they were cooler. Scale insects reached their highest densities in the city, but abundance peaked at similar temperatures in urban and historical datasets and tracked temperature on a decadal scale. Although urban habitats are highly modified, species response to a key abiotic factor, temperature, was consistent across urban and rural-forest ecosystems. Cities may be an appropriate but underused system for developing and testing hypotheses about biological effects of climate change. Future work should test the applicability of this model to other groups of organisms.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 168 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
Mexico 2 1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Puerto Rico 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 155 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 40 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 38 23%
Student > Master 27 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 8%
Student > Bachelor 13 8%
Other 27 16%
Unknown 10 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 89 53%
Environmental Science 43 26%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 7 4%
Design 3 2%
Social Sciences 2 1%
Other 8 5%
Unknown 16 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 84. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 September 2018.
All research outputs
#197,097
of 13,472,025 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#172
of 3,666 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,336
of 199,461 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#3
of 75 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,472,025 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,666 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 199,461 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 75 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.