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Cafeteria diet impairs expression of sensory-specific satiety and stimulus-outcome learning

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Psychology, August 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
16 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
twitter
101 tweeters
facebook
24 Facebook pages
googleplus
3 Google+ users
video
3 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
69 Mendeley
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Title
Cafeteria diet impairs expression of sensory-specific satiety and stimulus-outcome learning
Published in
Frontiers in Psychology, August 2014
DOI 10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00852
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amy C. Reichelt, Margaret J. Morris, R. F. Westbrook

Abstract

A range of animal and human data demonstrates that excessive consumption of palatable food leads to neuroadaptive responses in brain circuits underlying reward. Unrestrained consumption of palatable food has been shown to increase the reinforcing value of food and weaken inhibitory control; however, whether it impacts upon the sensory representations of palatable solutions has not been formally tested. These experiments sought to determine whether exposure to a cafeteria diet consisting of palatable high fat foods impacts upon the ability of rats to learn about food-associated cues and the sensory properties of ingested foods. We found that rats fed a cafeteria diet for 2 weeks were impaired in the control of Pavlovian responding in accordance to the incentive value of palatable outcomes associated with auditory cues following devaluation by sensory-specific satiety. Sensory-specific satiety is one mechanism by which a diet containing different foods increases ingestion relative to one lacking variety. Hence, choosing to consume greater quantities of a range of foods may contribute to the current prevalence of obesity. We observed that rats fed a cafeteria diet for 2 weeks showed impaired sensory-specific satiety following consumption of a high calorie solution. The deficit in expression of sensory-specific satiety was also present 1 week following the withdrawal of cafeteria foods. Thus, exposure to obesogenic diets may impact upon neurocircuitry involved in motivated control of behavior.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 101 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 2 3%
Denmark 1 1%
New Zealand 1 1%
Italy 1 1%
Romania 1 1%
Norway 1 1%
Greece 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 60 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 28%
Student > Bachelor 14 20%
Researcher 13 19%
Student > Master 6 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 3 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 17 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 13%
Neuroscience 5 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 4%
Other 12 17%
Unknown 9 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 238. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 July 2020.
All research outputs
#73,336
of 15,926,621 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Psychology
#131
of 16,051 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#910
of 202,806 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Psychology
#3
of 361 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,926,621 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 16,051 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 202,806 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 361 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.