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Prevalence, associations, and adequacy of treatment of major depression in patients with cancer: a cross-sectional analysis of routinely collected clinical data

Overview of attention for article published in "The Lancet Psychiatry", October 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
12 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
64 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
116 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
177 Mendeley
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Title
Prevalence, associations, and adequacy of treatment of major depression in patients with cancer: a cross-sectional analysis of routinely collected clinical data
Published in
"The Lancet Psychiatry", October 2014
DOI 10.1016/s2215-0366(14)70313-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jane Walker, Christian Holm Hansen, Paul Martin, Stefan Symeonides, Ravi Ramessur, Gordon Murray, Michael Sharpe

Abstract

Major depression is an important complication of cancer. However, reliable data are lacking for the prevalence of depression in patients with cancer in different primary sites, the association of depression with demographic and clinical variables within cancer groupings, and the proportion of depressed patients with cancer receiving potentially effective treatment for depression. We investigated these questions with data from a large representative clinical sample. We analysed data from patients with breast, lung, colorectal, genitourinary, or gynaecological cancer who had participated in routine screening for depression in cancer clinics in Scotland, UK between May 12, 2008, and Aug 24, 2011. Depression screening was done in two stages (first, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; then, major depression section of the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition). Data for depression status were linked with demographic and clinical data obtained from the Scottish National Cancer Registry. We analysed data for 21 151 patients. The prevalence of major depression was highest in patients with lung cancer (13·1%, 95% CI 11·9-14·2%), followed by gynaecological cancer (10·9%, 9·8-12·1), breast cancer (9·3%, 8·7-10·0), colorectal cancer (7·0%, 6·1-8·0), and genitourinary cancer (5·6%, 4·5-6·7). Within these cancer groupings, a diagnosis of major depression was more likely in patients who were younger, had worse social deprivation scores, and, for lung cancer and colorectal cancer, female patients. 1130 (73%) of 1538 patients with depression and complete patient-reported treatment data were not receiving potentially effective treatment. Major depression is common in patients attending cancer clinics and most goes untreated. A pressing need exists to improve the management of major depression for patients attending specialist cancer services. Cancer Research UK and Chief Scientist Office of the Scottish Government.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 64 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 177 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 2%
Spain 2 1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Uruguay 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Unknown 169 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 27 15%
Student > Master 25 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 11%
Student > Postgraduate 17 10%
Researcher 16 9%
Other 45 25%
Unknown 28 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 58 33%
Psychology 49 28%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 3%
Social Sciences 3 2%
Other 15 8%
Unknown 31 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 146. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 March 2018.
All research outputs
#113,545
of 14,417,400 outputs
Outputs from "The Lancet Psychiatry"
#179
of 1,646 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,684
of 200,910 outputs
Outputs of similar age from "The Lancet Psychiatry"
#3
of 68 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,417,400 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,646 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 73.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 200,910 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 68 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.