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Energy landscape and dynamics of brain activity during human bistable perception

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, August 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
32 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
36 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
149 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
Energy landscape and dynamics of brain activity during human bistable perception
Published in
Nature Communications, August 2014
DOI 10.1038/ncomms5765
Pubmed ID
Authors

Takamitsu Watanabe, Naoki Masuda, Fukuda Megumi, Ryota Kanai, Geraint Rees

Abstract

Individual differences in the structure of parietal and prefrontal cortex predict the stability of bistable visual perception. However, the mechanisms linking such individual differences in brain structures to behaviour remain elusive. Here we demonstrate a systematic relationship between the dynamics of brain activity, cortical structure and behaviour underpinning bistable perception. Using fMRI in humans, we find that the activity dynamics during bistable perception are well described as fluctuating between three spatially distributed energy minimums: visual-area-dominant, frontal-area-dominant and intermediate states. Transitions between these energy minimums predicted behaviour, with participants whose brain activity tend to reflect the visual-area-dominant state exhibiting more stable perception and those whose activity transits to frontal-area-dominant states reporting more frequent perceptual switches. Critically, these brain activity dynamics are correlated with individual differences in grey matter volume of the corresponding brain areas. Thus, individual differences in the large-scale dynamics of brain activity link focal brain structure with bistable perception.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 32 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 149 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 4 3%
Italy 3 2%
Germany 2 1%
China 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 136 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 40 27%
Researcher 34 23%
Student > Master 20 13%
Unspecified 11 7%
Student > Postgraduate 11 7%
Other 32 21%
Unknown 1 <1%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 34 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 15%
Neuroscience 22 15%
Unspecified 16 11%
Physics and Astronomy 15 10%
Other 38 26%
Unknown 1 <1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 October 2016.
All research outputs
#860,651
of 13,384,417 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#10,297
of 23,790 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,026
of 199,390 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#263
of 662 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,384,417 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 23,790 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 47.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 199,390 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 662 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.