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Bioaccumulation and Toxicity of CuO Nanoparticles by a Freshwater Invertebrate after Waterborne and Dietborne Exposures

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, August 2014
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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3 tweeters

Citations

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Readers on

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81 Mendeley
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Title
Bioaccumulation and Toxicity of CuO Nanoparticles by a Freshwater Invertebrate after Waterborne and Dietborne Exposures
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, August 2014
DOI 10.1021/es5018703
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marie-Noële Croteau, Superb K. Misra, Samuel N. Luoma, Eugenia Valsami-Jones

Abstract

The incidental ingestion of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) can be an important route of uptake for aquatic organisms. Yet, knowledge of dietary bioavailability and toxicity of NPs is scarce. Here we used isotopically modified copper oxide ((65)CuO) NPs to characterize the processes governing their bioaccumulation in a freshwater snail after waterborne and dietborne exposures. Lymnaea stagnalis efficiently accumulated (65)Cu after aqueous and dietary exposures to (65)CuO NPs. Cu assimilation efficiency and feeding rates averaged 83% and 0.61 g g(-1) d(-1) at low exposure concentrations (<100 nmol g(-1)), and declined by nearly 50% above this concentration. We estimated that 80-90% of the bioaccumulated (65)Cu concentration in L. stagnalis originated from the (65)CuO NPs, suggesting that dissolution had a negligible influence on Cu uptake from the NPs under our experimental conditions. The physiological loss of (65)Cu incorporated into tissues after exposures to (65)CuO NPs was rapid over the first days of depuration and not detectable thereafter. As a result, large Cu body concentrations are expected in L. stagnalis after exposure to CuO NPs. To the degree that there is a link between bioaccumulation and toxicity, dietborne exposures to CuO NPs are likely to elicit adverse effects more readily than waterborne exposures.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 81 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
France 1 1%
Unknown 79 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 28%
Researcher 15 19%
Student > Master 14 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Student > Bachelor 4 5%
Other 10 12%
Unknown 9 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 30 37%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 11%
Engineering 5 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 6%
Chemical Engineering 4 5%
Other 10 12%
Unknown 18 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 September 2014.
All research outputs
#1,983,818
of 4,507,652 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#2,473
of 4,705 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45,246
of 114,993 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#117
of 213 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,652 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 53rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,705 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.5. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 114,993 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 213 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.