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Proximity to vector breeding site and risk of Plasmodium vivax infection: a prospective cohort study in rural Ethiopia

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
26 Mendeley
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Title
Proximity to vector breeding site and risk of Plasmodium vivax infection: a prospective cohort study in rural Ethiopia
Published in
Malaria Journal, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12936-017-2031-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alexander Nissen, Jackie Cook, Eskindir Loha, Bernt Lindtjørn

Abstract

Despite falling incidence and mortality since the turn of the century, malaria remains an important global health challenge. In the future fight against malaria, greater emphasis will have to be placed on understanding and addressing malaria caused by the Plasmodium vivax parasite. Unfortunately, due to years of neglect and underfunding, there are currently many gaps in knowledge of P. vivax malaria. The aims of the present study were to explore the association between distance to vector breeding site and P. vivax infection in rural Ethiopia, and, secondarily, to test whether this association varies with age. A prospective, cohort study of all residents in the Chano Mille Kebele in southern Ethiopia from April 2009 to March 2011 (n = 8121). Weekly household follow up visits included screening for febrile cases (active surveillance). Participants were also asked to contact the local health centre if they experienced subjective fever between visits (passive surveillance). Plasmodium vivax infection was confirmed using microscopy by two independent readers. Information was collected on demographics and household characteristics including GPS-determined distance to vector breeding site. Data was analysed using Cox regression modelling. Overall the P. vivax infection rate was 12.3/1000 person-years (95% CI 10.5-14.5). Mean household distance to breeding site was 2449 m (range 1646-3717 m). Fully adjusted results showed very strong evidence of an association between proximity to breeding site and P. vivax infection: rate ratio = 3.47 (95% CI 2.15-5.60; P < 0.001) comparing the group closest to the breeding site (distance < 2100 m; n = 1383) to the group furthest away (distance > 2700 m; n = 2460). There was no evidence that age was an effect modifier in the association. Results showed strong evidence that household proximity to vector breeding site is positively associated with P. vivax infection in rural Ethiopia, and that this association is constant across age groups. The findings might influence how net-distribution and indoor residual spraying campaigns are planned, help guide strategies on water resource development by highlighting potential health effects of man-made dams near human habitats, and add to current educational information given to people living close to breeding sites.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 19%
Student > Bachelor 4 15%
Researcher 2 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 8%
Other 6 23%
Unknown 5 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 31%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 8%
Environmental Science 1 4%
Mathematics 1 4%
Other 5 19%
Unknown 6 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 October 2017.
All research outputs
#798,885
of 12,056,897 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#190
of 3,513 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#32,795
of 267,993 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#9
of 121 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,056,897 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,513 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,993 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 121 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.