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Genome editing reveals a role for OCT4 in human embryogenesis

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
78 news outlets
blogs
21 blogs
twitter
247 tweeters
facebook
19 Facebook pages
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
5 Google+ users
reddit
2 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
130 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
498 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
Genome editing reveals a role for OCT4 in human embryogenesis
Published in
Nature, September 2017
DOI 10.1038/nature24033
Pubmed ID
Authors

Norah M. E. Fogarty, Afshan McCarthy, Kirsten E. Snijders, Benjamin E. Powell, Nada Kubikova, Paul Blakeley, Rebecca Lea, Kay Elder, Sissy E. Wamaitha, Daesik Kim, Valdone Maciulyte, Jens Kleinjung, Jin-Soo Kim, Dagan Wells, Ludovic Vallier, Alessandro Bertero, James M. A. Turner, Kathy K. Niakan

Abstract

Despite their fundamental biological and clinical importance, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the first cell fate decisions in the human embryo are not well understood. Here we use CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome editing to investigate the function of the pluripotency transcription factor OCT4 during human embryogenesis. We identified an efficient OCT4-targeting guide RNA using an inducible human embryonic stem cell-based system and microinjection of mouse zygotes. Using these refined methods, we efficiently and specifically targeted the gene encoding OCT4 (POU5F1) in diploid human zygotes and found that blastocyst development was compromised. Transcriptomics analysis revealed that, in POU5F1-null cells, gene expression was downregulated not only for extra-embryonic trophectoderm genes, such as CDX2, but also for regulators of the pluripotent epiblast, including NANOG. By contrast, Pou5f1-null mouse embryos maintained the expression of orthologous genes, and blastocyst development was established, but maintenance was compromised. We conclude that CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome editing is a powerful method for investigating gene function in the context of human development.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 247 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 498 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 498 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 110 22%
Researcher 99 20%
Student > Master 74 15%
Student > Bachelor 71 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 24 5%
Other 74 15%
Unknown 46 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 216 43%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 139 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 22 4%
Neuroscience 14 3%
Engineering 11 2%
Other 34 7%
Unknown 62 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 906. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 March 2020.
All research outputs
#5,973
of 14,565,263 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#906
of 72,654 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#215
of 273,703 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#23
of 900 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,565,263 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 72,654 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 80.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,703 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 900 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.