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Do Laboratory Species Protect Endangered Species? Interspecies Variation in Responses to 17β-Estradiol, a Model Endocrine Active Compound

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Environmental Contamination & Toxicology, August 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

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4 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

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17 Mendeley
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Title
Do Laboratory Species Protect Endangered Species? Interspecies Variation in Responses to 17β-Estradiol, a Model Endocrine Active Compound
Published in
Archives of Environmental Contamination & Toxicology, August 2014
DOI 10.1007/s00244-014-0076-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Z. G. Jorgenson, K. Buhl, S. E. Bartell, H. L. Schoenfuss

Abstract

Although the effects of estrogens on model laboratory species are well documented, their utility as surrogates for other species, including those listed as endangered, are less clear. Traditionally, conservation policies are evaluated based on model organism responses but are intended to protect all species in an environment. We tested the hypothesis that the endangered Rio Grande silvery minnow (Hybognathus amarus) is more vulnerable to endocrine disruption-as assessed through its larval predator-escape performance, survival, juvenile sex ratios, and whole-body vitellogenin concentration-than the commonly used toxicological model species fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and the bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus). Fish were exposed concurrently for 21 days to the model endocrine active compound (EAC) 17ß-estradiol (E2) at 10 ng E2/L and 30 ng E2/L in a flow-through system using reconstituted water that simulated the physicochemical conditions of the Middle Rio Grande in New Mexico, USA. No significant differences were observed between the fathead and silvery minnow in larval predator-escape response or juvenile sex ratio. Rio Grande silvery minnow survival decreased significantly at day 14 compared with the other two species; by day 21, both cyprinid species (silvery minnow and fathead minnow) exhibited a significant decrease in survival compared with bluegill sunfish, a member of the family Centrarchidae. Male Rio Grande silvery minnow showed a significant increase in whole-body vitellogenin concentration in the 10 ng/L treatment, whereas fathead minnow and bluegill sunfish showed no significant increases in vitellogenin concentrations across treatments. Our study showed response differences to estrogen exposures between the two cyprinid species and further divergence in responses between the families Cyprinidae and Centrarchidae. These results suggest that commonly used laboratory model organisms may be less sensitive to EACs than the endangered Rio Grande silvery minnow. However, this study supports the continued use of surrogate species for the beneficial implementation of water-quality regulations for the protection of threatened and endangered species if phylogenetic relationships are taken into consideration.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 18%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 18%
Student > Master 2 12%
Researcher 2 12%
Other 4 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 41%
Environmental Science 3 18%
Unspecified 2 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 6%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 6%
Other 3 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 April 2015.
All research outputs
#6,553,415
of 12,225,503 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Environmental Contamination & Toxicology
#847
of 1,395 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#77,565
of 209,294 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Environmental Contamination & Toxicology
#5
of 36 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,225,503 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,395 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 209,294 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 36 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.