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Understanding the context for pet cat and dog feeding and exercising behaviour among pet owners in Ireland: a qualitative study

Overview of attention for article published in Irish Veterinary Journal, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#21 of 152)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
57 Mendeley
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Title
Understanding the context for pet cat and dog feeding and exercising behaviour among pet owners in Ireland: a qualitative study
Published in
Irish Veterinary Journal, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13620-017-0107-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Martin J. Downes, Catherine Devitt, Marie T. Downes, Simon J. More

Abstract

Pet cat and dog obesity contributes to increased risk of several diseases, including cancer and diabetes mellitus as well as a worsening of orthopaedic problems, and a reduction in survival rate. This study aims to develop a better understanding of cat and dog owners' self-reported beliefs and factors that influence owner behaviour around feeding and exercising their pet cat or dog, as there is a lack of in-depth understanding in this area. Seven focus group discussions, with 43 pet owners in total, were conducted. Pet owners often reported a perceived a low level of control over feeding; often undermined by other people feeding of their pet, their pets begging for food, and their pets attitude towards food. Treats were used in the absence of owner control over pet begging and emotional attachment, and to influence pet behaviour. The majority of participants had positive attitudes to pet exercise, which could be related to pet specific requirements, especially differences in cats and dogs. There were some negative experiences of stress associated with dog walking and fears over aggressive confrontations with other dogs. Feeding one's pet is influenced by beliefs about pet specific needs, pet food and pet health, pet owners' perceived control over feeding, and the implications for the pet owner. Pet exercise is influenced by beliefs about pet specific exercise needs, and the implications of exercising one's pet for the pet owner. Understanding owner behaviours on feeding and exercise allows for a more targeted approach to preventing and treating pet obesity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 57 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 22 39%
Unspecified 10 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 14%
Student > Master 6 11%
Other 4 7%
Other 7 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 30 53%
Unspecified 10 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 5%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Other 7 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 November 2018.
All research outputs
#2,926,636
of 12,896,547 outputs
Outputs from Irish Veterinary Journal
#21
of 152 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#71,660
of 268,946 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Irish Veterinary Journal
#2
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,896,547 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 152 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,946 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.