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The risk of sustained sexual transmission of Zika is underestimated

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS Pathogens, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
120 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
56 Mendeley
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Title
The risk of sustained sexual transmission of Zika is underestimated
Published in
PLoS Pathogens, September 2017
DOI 10.1371/journal.ppat.1006633
Pubmed ID
Authors

Antoine Allard, Benjamin M. Althouse, Laurent Hébert-Dufresne, Samuel V. Scarpino, James Lloyd-Smith

Abstract

Pathogens often follow more than one transmission route during outbreaks-from needle sharing plus sexual transmission of HIV to small droplet aerosol plus fomite transmission of influenza. Thus, controlling an infectious disease outbreak often requires characterizing the risk associated with multiple mechanisms of transmission. For example, during the Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa, weighing the relative importance of funeral versus health care worker transmission was essential to stopping disease spread. As a result, strategic policy decisions regarding interventions must rely on accurately characterizing risks associated with multiple transmission routes. The ongoing Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak challenges our conventional methodologies for translating case-counts into route-specific transmission risk. Critically, most approaches will fail to accurately estimate the risk of sustained sexual transmission of a pathogen that is primarily vectored by a mosquito-such as the risk of sustained sexual transmission of ZIKV. By computationally investigating a novel mathematical approach for multi-route pathogens, our results suggest that previous epidemic threshold estimates could under-estimate the risk of sustained sexual transmission by at least an order of magnitude. This result, coupled with emerging clinical, epidemiological, and experimental evidence for an increased risk of sexual transmission, would strongly support recent calls to classify ZIKV as a sexually transmitted infection.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 120 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 55 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 25%
Student > Master 9 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 13%
Unspecified 6 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 9%
Other 15 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 20%
Unspecified 9 16%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 9%
Social Sciences 4 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 7%
Other 23 41%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 121. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 February 2019.
All research outputs
#125,493
of 13,500,278 outputs
Outputs from PLoS Pathogens
#101
of 6,248 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,545
of 270,175 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS Pathogens
#5
of 166 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,500,278 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,248 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,175 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 166 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.