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Does access to credit services influence availability of essential child medicines and licensing status among private medicine retail outlets in Uganda?

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice, September 2017
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Title
Does access to credit services influence availability of essential child medicines and licensing status among private medicine retail outlets in Uganda?
Published in
Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40545-017-0116-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lorraine Nabbanja Kabunga, Paschal Mujasi

Abstract

Despite making great progress in reducing under five mortality in the last three decades. Uganda still ranks high among countries with the highest under five mortality rates. More than a third (36%) of these deaths are caused by pneumonia (15%), malaria (12%), or diarrhea (9%). For many mothers and caregivers, private drug shops are a point of care seeking for these illnesses. However, many drug-shops, are unlicensed and do not stock essential commodities due to insufficient capital and operational funds. This study set out to understand the relationship, between access to credit services through financial loans or stock and i) availability of essential child medicines and ii) licensing status among medicine retail outlet including drug shops and pharmacies. This was a cross-sectional study conducted between April and March 2016. The country was divided into 168 enumeration areas based on the geographical regions and household population distribution within the region; these served as the primary sampling units. Within each enumeration area, all private medicine retail outlets (drug-shops and pharmacies) that provide consultation for childhood illnesses were identified and surveyed. Data on access to credit services was collected through interviews and data on stock, through observations of shelves for Oral rehydration salts, amoxicillin dispersible tablets, amoxicillin syrup, Artemether combined therapies, and Zinc dispersible tablets. Android tablets were used for data collection and results were analyzed using STATA12. A total of 586 outlets were visited during the study, 96% were drug shops and 4% were pharmacies. For all five essential child medicines assessed, access to credit through financial loans or through obtaining stock on credit did not influence stock availability. Access to credit services through loans or through stock on credit was seen to influence licensing status. The odds increased by more than 50% (1.53, CI: 1.27-2) among outlets who accessed loans compared to those who hadn't and by 2 fold (2, CI: 1.03-3.8) among those who accessed stock on credit than in those who had not. Access to credit does not influence stock availability of essential child medicines among private medicine outlets, however, it has an effect on licensing status. In addition to further research, the provision of financing mechanisms to support the licensing processes could increase the proportion of unlicensed outlets.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 13%
Student > Master 3 13%
Other 2 9%
Student > Bachelor 1 4%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 7 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 30%
Social Sciences 4 17%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 4%
Psychology 1 4%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 7 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 November 2017.
All research outputs
#7,551,980
of 12,083,996 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice
#127
of 152 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#152,832
of 268,523 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice
#8
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,083,996 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 152 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,523 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.